Books

Ernest Hemingway, Reporter

The years spent as a reporter painting the scene in Parisian cafes and on tuna fishing boats in Spain sharpened Ernest Hemingway's ability to carefully, confidently build a story.


By-Line: Ernest Hemingway

Publisher: Scribner
Length: 512 pages
Author: Edited by William White
Amazon

A Moveable Feast

Publisher: Scribner
Length: 219 pages
Author: Ernest Hemingway
Amazon

In Our Time

Publisher: Scribner
Length: 160 pages
Author: Ernest Hemingway
Amazon

Between third class train rides and afternoons at the racetrack, Ernest Hemingway filed "Living on $1,000 a Year in Paris" with an editor at the Toronto Daily Star in 1922. After a stint as a cub reporter at the Kansas City Star -- where he was inevitably "forced to write a simple declarative sentence," he later explained -- the young writer was offered a job at the Canadian paper in 1920. Hemingway then took on a correspondent role at their Paris office and moved to France after marrying Elizabeth "Hadley" Richardson.

In less than 600 words, Hemingway tallies in "Living on $1,000 a Year in Paris" the considerable lengths to which he and his wife could go with the Canadian or American dollar in France's capital city at the time. It's due to "prices not having advanced in proportion to" the dollar's "increased value." Meals are compared to the "best restaurants in America" in his piece, and the lodging is "comfortable." These are indeed the spare declarative sentiments of a dry newspaper report, and it's a bit short for what appears to be a meaty collection of nonfiction at Byliner.com, where "Living on $1,000..." was submitted for perusal in early July of this year. Part social network, part digital publisher, Byliner launched in June. It connects readers to writers, but also to other readers, who are free to browse the hub's digital archives for worthwhile narratives as well as submit links to stories not already collected at the site.

As of my writing this, Ernest Hemingway is among the most read authors at Byliner. Even if this particular piece of original reporting from him is a bit skimpy, "Living on $1,000 a Year in Paris" arguably demonstrates Hemingway's acumen with observation at an early point in his career.

In the posthumously published A Moveable Feast, Hemingway wrote that in Paris back then you could forego buying new clothes and sometimes meals to live "very well on almost nothing." This memoir of his life in France during the 1920s may or may not have been pieced together from notes left in a trunk beneath the Ritz Hotel. It's rich with passages like this one, which details the first apartment he shared with Hadley in Paris:

Home in the rue Cardinal Lemoine was a two-room flat that had no hot water and no inside toilet facilities except an antiseptic container, not uncomfortable to anyone who was used to a Michigan outhouse. With a fine view and a good mattress and springs for a comfortable bed on the floor, and pictures we liked on the walls, it was a cheerful, gay flat.

Meals in the book are recounted with similarly palpable enthusiasm:

The beer was very cold and wonderful to drink. The pommes a l'huile were firm and marinated and the olive oil delicious. I ground the black pepper over the potatoes and moistened the bread in the olive oil. After the first heavy draft of beer I drank and ate very slowly. When the pommes a l'huile were gone I ordered another serving and a cervelas. This was a sausage like a heavy, wide frankfurter split in two and covered with a special mustard sauce.

Of Hemingway's writing, William White suggested, "If the details were sometimes slighted, the picture as a whole -- full of the emotional impact of the events on the people -- was clear, lucid in full." White selectively compiled the author's articles and newspaper and magazine dispatches dated between 1920 and 1956 for a bestselling book called, incidentally, By-Line: Ernest Hemingway in 1967.

I've read a lot of Hemingway's short stories, but have only just begun to work my way through By-Line, which includes his contributions to Esquire, Collier's, and more. And save for what was required of me in high school English classes, I hadn't really digested any of his stories until I picked up In Our Time at a used bookstore when I was an undergrad. In finally getting to Hemingway's fluid magazine work, I can't dispute that the years spent painting the scene in Parisian cafes and on tuna fishing boats in Spain sharpened his ability to carefully, confidently build a story.

Charles A. Fenton wrote in The Apprenticeship of Ernest Hemingway that while his subject wasn't earning a lot of money for the Toronto Star Weekly pieces, "he had earned enough and written enough to legitimately think of himself as a writer." Sample the bountifully detailed vignettes that the author fit into his newspaper schedule during the 1920s to absorb the effect that reporting had on him as a storyteller. The crisp opening sentences of In Our Time's "The Three-Day Blow":

The rain stopped as Nick turned into the road that went up through the orchard. The fruit had been picked and the fall wind blew through the bare trees. Nick stopped and picked up a Wagner apple from beside the road, shiny in the brown grass from the rain. He put the apple in the pocket of his Mackinaw coat.

As far as mining Hemingway's journalistic efforts for the dazzling creative phrases that would influence his fiction, one could do worse than to cite "American Bohemians in Paris a Weird Lot," which appeared in the Toronto Star's weekend magazine supplement in 1922. It was nabbed for inclusion in 1962's The Wild Years, and William White subsequently added it to the lot for By-Line, too. "American Bohemians..." boils over with searing criticism of the trendy American expatriate crowd at Cafe Rotonde. The author seizes upon the opportunity to spike his tone here, as it isn't the platform that calls for the straight reporting he toiled over during the week:

For the first dose of Rotonde individuals you might observe a short, dumpy woman with newly blond hair cut Old Dutch Cleanser fashion, a face like a pink enameled ham and fat fingers that reach out of the long blue silk sleeves of a Chinese-looking smock.

In The Paris Review interview, Hemingway told George Plimpton that after a certain point, journalism "can be a daily self-destruction for a serious creative writer." White touches on this in his introduction to By-Line. He discusses Hemingway's sponge-like ability to soak up "matter for his short stories and novels," but cites the author's contention that newspaper writers work on deadline to "make stuff timely rather than permanent." White points out that this better equipped Hemingway for his craft -- not reporting, but fiction, where he could "always use his material to suit his imaginative purposes."

Music
Music

All Kinds of Time: Adam Schlesinger's Pursuit of Pure, Peerless Pop

Adam Schlesinger was a poet laureate of pure pop music. There was never a melody too bright, a lyrical conceit too playfully dumb, or a vibe full of radiation that he would shy away from. His sudden passing from COVID-19 means one of the brightest stars in the power-pop universe has suddenly dimmed.

Music

Folkie Eliza Gilkyson Turns Up the Heat on '2020'

Eliza Gilkyson aims to inspire the troops of resistance on her superb new album, 2020. The ten songs serve as a rallying cry for the long haul.

Music

Billy Corgan Brainwashed Me: '90s Alternative Rock and the Introspective Abyss

Once in its thrall, these days I find the overriding message of '90s alt-rock especially naïve and even dangerous.

Music

Human Impact Hit Home with a Seismic First Album From a Veteran Lineup

On their self-titled debut, Human Impact provide a soundtrack for this dislocated moment where both humanity and nature are crying out for relief.

Music

PopMatters Seeks Music Critics and Essayists

If you're a smart, historically-minded music critic or essayist, let your voice be heard by the quality readership of PopMatters.

Music

Monophonics Are an Ardent Blast of True Rock 'n' Soul on 'It's Only Us'

The third time's the charm as Bay Area soul sextet Monophonics release their shiniest record yet in It's Only Us.

Music

Bobby Previte / Jamie Saft / Nels Cline: Music from the Early 21st Century

A power-trio of electric guitar, keyboards, and drums takes on the challenge of free improvisation—but using primarily elements of rock and electronica as strongly as the usual creative music or jazz. The result is focused.

Music

JARV IS... - "House Music All Night Long" (Singles Going Steady)

"House Music All Night Long" is a song our inner, self-isolated freaks can jive to. JARV IS... cleverly captures how dazed and confused some of us may feel over the current pandemic, trapped in our homes.

Books
Books

Does Inclusivity Mean That Everyone Does the Same Thing?

What is the meaning of diversity in today's world? Russell Jacoby raises and addresses some pertinent questions in his latest work, On Diversity.

Books

Phuc Tran's Existential Trip of a Memoir, 'Sigh, Gone'

Phuc Tran's smart, tough memoir, Sigh, Gone, might launch a broken down kid to read 150 great books—for free, at the local library.

Books

Classic Shōjo Today: Moto Hagio's 'The Poe Clan'

Moto Hagio's The Poe Clan manga series a gender-fluid melodrama marked by deep psychological trauma.

Books

John Pham's ​J​&K​​ - It's a Matter of Perspective

In J&K, John Pham explores perspectives in the psychological sense. Like Picasso, he views things from more than one angle.

Film
Film

'Slay the Dragon' Is a Road Map of the GOP's Methods for Dividing and Conquering American Democracy

If a time traveler from the past wanted to learn how to subvert democracy for a few million bucks, gerrymandering documentary Slay the Dragon would be a superb guide.

Film

The Road to Murder in Love and War: Three Films from Claude Chabrol

The character's in Claude Chabrol's The Third Lover, Line of Demarcation, and The Champagne Murders are obsessively doubled and mirrored, reflecting and refracting their hunger for sex, love, money, and power.

Film

'Memento' Is the Movie of the Attention Economy

We are afraid of time, and so like Leonard in Memento, we kill it, compulsively and indiscriminately.

Film

What Lurks Beneath: 'Jaws' and Political Leadership in the Time of COVID-19

Boris Johnson admires the Mayor in Spielberg's Jaws. Remember him? He was the guy who wouldn't close the beaches -- and sacrifice that revenue source -- during a public crisis.

Recent
Music

JARV IS... - "House Music All Night Long" (Singles Going Steady)

"House Music All Night Long" is a song our inner, self-isolated freaks can jive to. JARV IS... cleverly captures how dazed and confused some of us may feel over the current pandemic, trapped in our homes.

Music

All Kinds of Time: Adam Schlesinger's Pursuit of Pure, Peerless Pop

Adam Schlesinger was a poet laureate of pure pop music. There was never a melody too bright, a lyrical conceit too playfully dumb, or a vibe full of radiation that he would shy away from. His sudden passing from COVID-19 means one of the brightest stars in the power-pop universe has suddenly dimmed.

Music

Folkie Eliza Gilkyson Turns Up the Heat on '2020'

Eliza Gilkyson aims to inspire the troops of resistance on her superb new album, 2020. The ten songs serve as a rallying cry for the long haul.

Music

Human Impact Hit Home with a Seismic First Album From a Veteran Lineup

On their self-titled debut, Human Impact provide a soundtrack for this dislocated moment where both humanity and nature are crying out for relief.

Music

Monophonics Are an Ardent Blast of True Rock 'n' Soul on 'It's Only Us'

The third time's the charm as Bay Area soul sextet Monophonics release their shiniest record yet in It's Only Us.

Film

'Slay the Dragon' Is a Road Map of the GOP's Methods for Dividing and Conquering American Democracy

If a time traveler from the past wanted to learn how to subvert democracy for a few million bucks, gerrymandering documentary Slay the Dragon would be a superb guide.

Music

Bobby Previte / Jamie Saft / Nels Cline: Music from the Early 21st Century

A power-trio of electric guitar, keyboards, and drums takes on the challenge of free improvisation—but using primarily elements of rock and electronica as strongly as the usual creative music or jazz. The result is focused.

Books

Does Inclusivity Mean That Everyone Does the Same Thing?

What is the meaning of diversity in today's world? Russell Jacoby raises and addresses some pertinent questions in his latest work, On Diversity.

Music

The Killers - "Caution" (Singles Going Steady)

The Killers go for the big hooks and singable anthems on "Caution", but opinion is sharply divided about the song's merits amongst our Singles Going Steady panel.

Music

Lilly Hiatt - "Some Kind of Drug" (Singles Going Steady)

Lilly Hiatt sings about a different kind of love on "Some Kind of Drug". Hers is for a city and the impact gentrification has had its soul.

Music

There's Never Enough Time for Folk Music's James Elkington

The sometimes Wilco and Richard Thompson sideman, in-demand producer, and songwriter, James Elkington, muses on why it's taking longer than he expects to achieve more in a week than most of us get done in a lifetime.

Music

Billy Corgan Brainwashed Me: '90s Alternative Rock and the Introspective Abyss

Once in its thrall, these days I find the overriding message of '90s alt-rock especially naïve and even dangerous.

Books

Classic Shōjo Today: Moto Hagio's 'The Poe Clan'

Moto Hagio's The Poe Clan manga series a gender-fluid melodrama marked by deep psychological trauma.

Music

Salsa Band LPT Hints at the Genre's Future

LPT's debut album, Sin Parar, hits all the right notes for a contemporary salsa album.

Music

Jennah Barry Offers Up a Warm, Sublime Collection of Memorable Tunes on 'Holiday'

Canadian indie folkster Jennah Barry returns with her long-awaited sophomore album, Holiday, which takes on a looser, more relaxed approach.

Music

Fotocrime's '80s-Inspired Rock Is Often Half-Baked

Fotocrime's South of Heaven is interesting mostly in that it's one of the most mediocre rock records I've heard in a long time.

Music

Maria McKee Puts Down Her Electric Guitar and Picks up Dante on 'La Vita Nuova'

"Show Me Heaven" was another country. Maria McKee has moved to England, immersed herself in the Classics and turned away from the 21st century.

Books

Phuc Tran's Existential Trip of a Memoir, 'Sigh, Gone'

Phuc Tran's smart, tough memoir, Sigh, Gone, might launch a broken down kid to read 150 great books—for free, at the local library.

Reviews
Collapse Expand Reviews
Features
Collapse Expand Features
PM Picks
Collapse Expand Pm Picks

© 1999-2020 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.