Film

The 10 Best 'Found Footage' Films of All Time

With the stink of Apollo 18 still fresh, here are 10 examples of the first person POV subgenre that actually work.

With a weak opening of barely $9 million, Apollo 18 stunk up the September box office this past Labor Day Weekend. Few had much faith in a film that was jostled around the release schedule in such a random manner, and the lack of a significant press screening more or less sealed the deal. But there's another factor involved in the flop that few have mentioned - the significant struggle required to make a good first person, POV, found footage film. The list of pretenders to the throne - The Poughkeepsie Tapes, The Zombie Diaries, The Last Horror Movie - are many, and for every classic take on the material, there are dozens of desperate wannabes who can't seem to create compelling characters (Paranormal Activity) or a suspenseful storyline (The Last Exorcism).

In a nutshell, here's the inherent problem with the category - the audience has to believe they are seeing something real. They have to believe that there's a reason for a constantly filming camera (even in light of impending danger). They have to believe in the images captured. And they have to believe that the threat will continue to grow worse. The viewer should want to avert their eyes, not permanently close them in bored out of their brain tedium. It's one of the most delicate and deceptive balancing acts in all of cinema. Perhaps this is why successful examples are so rare. In the case of the ten titles listed here, more than a few have flaws. In fact, only a couple are close to perfect. What they all have in common is the ability to deliver on their promise - and in the first person, POV, found footage arena, that's a major accomplishment.

 
#10 - In the Dark
Undoubtedly, few have heard of this low budget independent offering, a movie that features several inebriated teens entering a supposedly haunted asylum to test their terror tenacity. Using a first person POV perspective as well as severally slyly placed surveillance cameras, this was the rare film that took the gimmicky premise and played it for as much misdirection and menace as possible. Unlike a low tech take such as Paranormal Activity which offered a few shocks and precious little else, this ghost story actually delivers the goods - over and over and over again.

 
#9 - The War Game
Perhaps one of the first films to ever explore the "you are there" dynamic from a purely serious and dramatic standpoint, this look at Britain pre and post nuclear annihilation would become the forerunner for later takes on the material, including NBC's shockingly superb 1983 entry Special Bulletin (a TV movie that actually fooled many watching at home). With its grim subject matter and predictions of devastation, War warned of a world that, luckily, we have yet to see. It even went on to win an Oscar for Best Documentary, highlighting it use of found footage to improve the authenticity of the storyline.

 
#8 - Cannibal Holocaust
Ruggero Deodato did such a great job recreating the flesh feasting crimes in this savage goona-goona satire of the media that he was actually detained by Italian police, accused of helming an actual snuff film. Of course, it was all faked, but this didn't stop urban legends and other conjecture from surrounding this sickening exercise in excess. Nowhere is the dichotomy between reality and ratings played out in such a slick, sick way. While the bookend material is a tad hamfisted (it makes Network look subtle), there is no denying the impact of the supposed "real" depictions of death.

 
#7 - The Troll Hunter
Bears have been - supposedly - attacking the locals in the uncivilized wilderness of upper Norway. A group of college journalists head out to explore the 'truth.' What they come up with is a startling discovery: there are trolls in them thar woods - and a government sponsored hunter out to stop their destructive and deadly rampage. Suddenly, the tone shifts from an ongoing mystery to a subtle black comedy about the bureaucratic headache of being the country's only legitimate sprite slayer. With some spectacular F/X and set-pieces, this low budget foreign effort really delivers on the promise of the overall POV premise.

 
#6 - Diary of the Dead
George Romero jumped into the found footage fray after the less than enthusiastic response for his fourth installment in the Dead series (Land of the…). With a fan base still clamoring for more zombie goodness, he came up with a clever way of resetting the franchise. In pure post-modern meta style, he showed the initial living dead outbreak from an amateur horror film crew's accidental perspective. They then go on to capture some unsettling hints of the outright dread to come. Some felt the macabre master was showing his age (and desperation) with such an approach, yet the results remain undeniably unsettling.

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