Music

Canned Heat: Live at Montreux 1973

Andy Johnson

When Canned Heat played the Montreux Festival in 1973, the band was a shadow of its former self.


Canned Heat

Live at Montreux 1973

Label: Eagle Rock
Amazon
iTunes

When Alan “Blind Owl” Wilson died in September 1970, possibly having committed suicide, it brought an end to the heyday of his legendary blues-boogie outfit Canned Heat. By the time what was left of the band played the 1973 Montreux Festival, it was crisis point. The group was soon saddled with $30,000 of debt, and drummer Fito de la Parra has written that they imported drugs from Mexico in order to help balance the books between shows.

These live recordings of the show document a band clearly struggling to cope with the problems of the era. The performances of classics like “On the Road Again” and especially “Let's Work Together” have only a fraction of the power they once held, and the dreary nine minutes of “Please Mr. Nixon” show that even these California boogie heroes could be lured into the worst of '70s excess. Die-hard fans likely possess the DVD version that was released some years ago, and to casual listeners Live in Montreux 1973 simply pales in comparison to the band's timeless late'60s recordings.

3

Oh, That Tiger!: Fritz Lang's Indian Epics

Fritz Lang's The Tiger of Eschnapur and The Indian Tomb are hothouse flowers of cinema with gyrating dancers, man-eating tigers, pagan magic, groaning lepers, and mythic moments. Has Lang ever come up with more desperate, mad, or heroic symbols of futile struggle?

Film

The 20 Best Folk Albums of 2019

Folk in 2019 is an image of inclusivity and unity in the face of international political upheaval. It's most captivating in its moments of sheer, heart-bearing authenticity and ensnares with new musical bearings introduced by some of its foremost innovators and newcomers to the scene.

Music
Pop Ten
Mixed Media
PM Picks

© 1999-2018 Popmatters.com. All rights reserved.
Popmatters is wholly independently owned and operated.