Music

The Best Country Music of 2011

Jedd Beaudoin, Dave Heaton, Josh Langhoff, and Jonathan Sanders

At first it seemed like an especially quiet year in country music, and in some ways it might have been. At the same time, country is country: it rolls on.

At first it seemed like an especially quiet year in country music, and in some ways it might have been. The first six months saw only a few big-name acts, or even semi-big ones, release albums. Several of the top sellers on the country charts, for much of the year, were albums released last year or the year before. More importantly, there were there few big surprises, not many exciting new movements or trends to stop you in your tracks. That was true whether you tend to be drawn more to the biggest-selling acts, to the “alt-country” side of the genre, or to the most traditional of today’s performers.

At the same time, country is country. Like the mountains, rivers, and wind that country singers sing about (or, for that matter, the pick-up trucks, the cold beer and the wise man sitting at the bar; the modern equivalents), it always is. It rolls on. The surface-level styles shift and mutate, but at its heart country music is. So this seeming off year for country was also a stellar year for country. The apparent state of stasis might have made, in the end, for a more exciting year for the genre, one where there wasn’t one dominant voice or story, and definitely not one obvious approach to take in tackling the genre.

The expected and the unexpected happened. Big stars released albums that landed with a thud of nonchalance, while others quietly surprised us. Legends kept steadfastly at it, adjusting for our times, while younger artists followed in their steps, yet followed in their own distinctive ways.

The story of the year was about the new and the old. Half of our top ten list is taken up by singers who started recording somewhere between 1961 and 1981. The other half includes three debut albums, a third album from a major-label artist following his own track in that world, and a fourth album from an indie-label group still getting their name out there. The old-timers and the newcomers alike are looking both backwards and forwards. The same can be said for the genre itself, which is always about its past as much as its present and future. Mostly, they all come together at once, and share a beer at that proverbial honky-tonk. Dave Heaton

 
Artist: Glen Campbell

Album: Ghost on the Canvas

Label: Surfdog

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Glen Campbell
Ghost on the Canvas

Ghost on the Canvas is Glen Campbell’s final album. Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2009, Campbell disclosed his illness earlier this year as he prepared for Ghost’s release and a subsequent tour. He and producer Julian Raymond co-wrote many songs on the album, although the Paul Westerberg-penned title cut remains the record’s real triumph. There’s an undeniable sense of both resignation and victory in Campbell’s voice as he sings the track, a performance that would easily make a younger man’s career and here makes the veteran performer’s impending departure all the more poignant. Other highlights include “Hold on Hope” (from Guided By Voices leader Robert Pollard) and Teddy Thompson’s typically fine “In My Arms”. The Campbell and Raymond numbers, namely “A Thousand Lifetimes” are equally fine and mighty in their resonance. To borrow a phrase from Westerberg, sadly beautiful. Jedd Beaudoin

 
Artist: Girls Guns and Glory

Album: Sweet Nothings

Label: Lonesome Day

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Girls Guns and Glory
Sweet Nothings

Girls Guns and Glory's Sweet Nothings showcases an alt-country band coming firmly into its own at long last, a worthy album to push the band closer to mainstream acceptance. Though they're still far from household names outside their native Boston, Ward Hayden and company bring traditional honky-tonk country and Americana into a modern country rock setting, melding Yoakam-esque vocals with the most uncompromising musicianship you'll find outside the confines of Nashville. Hayden's songwriting takes a big leap forward on this album, featuring crisp, clean melodies which stick in your head without feeling overly cluttered with conflicting ideas. A clear standout is "Nighttime", with the straight-ahead propulsion Johnny Cash popularized, layered atop steel guitar, handclaps, and mandolin pickings, all providing perfect balance to Hayden’s trademark wail. Sweet Nothings blazes its own trail, proving Girls Guns and Glory are ready to play with anyone, anytime, anyplace. Jonathan Sanders

 
Artist: Steel Magnolia

Album: Steel Magnolia

Label: Big Machine

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Steel Magnolia
Steel Magnolia

Co-ed duo Steel Magnolia is that loud couple you’d rather not double date with, because they’ll spend the whole evening making out, fighting, talking in cutie-pie voices, and busting out two-part harmonies with one another. Listen anyway. What might seem gloopy and embarrassing from a table away sounds like vibrant couples (or coupling?) music on record, especially as produced by Dann Huff, himself no stranger to bright shiny pop hits. These 12 duets represent a thorough tour of true love at every stage, and the album comes alive in Meghan and Joshua’s voices -- they seem to derive physical, even erotic, pleasure from the act of harmonizing together. Josh Langhoff

 
Artist: George Strait

Album: Here for a Good Time

Label: MCA Nashville

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George Strait
Here for a Good Time

After 25 studio albums, we don’t expect George Strait to surprise us. He’ll do something slightly different, like one Spanish song, and it’s treated like news. While this does feel like just another solid Strait album, it also surprises. It has a dual nature; half more laidback than usual and half especially serious. The lead singles were the upbeat face of the album; hiding behind them is a stark portrait of alcoholism, a song about how we’re all addicted to some kind of poison, and an especially moody, almost Gothic lost-love song. Then there’s a ridiculous goof of a fishing song, reminding us that his music is more well-rounded than we think. Dave Heaton

 
Artist: Merle Haggard

Album: Working in Tennessee

Label: Vanguard

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Merle Haggard
Working in Tennessee

At 74 Merle Haggard continues to surprise and continue the fine tradition of the Bakersfield sound. The California-born legend wrote or co-wrote the majority of the songs here (including revisiting some past glory), proving that he remains one country’s best songwriters. “Too Much Boogie Woogie”, “Down on the Houseboat” and “Laugh It Off” (in which Haggard, who once boasted about Oklahomans not smoking marijuana, sings the praises of Humboldt Co. bud) are three of the best, although “Workin’ Man Blues” (with pal Willie Nelson and son Ben Haggard) holds its own with those as well. The spirit of Johnny Cash hovers in a few corners, namely “Cocaine Blues” and the charmingly imperfect “Jackson” with current wife Theresa Haggard. Truth be told, it sounds like The Hag is just getting started. Jedd Beaudoin

Merle Haggard - Working In Tennessee by Vanguard Records

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