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Film

Fashion risk-takers steal the show at SAG Awards

Booth Moore
Los Angeles Times (MCT)
Emma Stone arrives at the 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards show at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California, on Sunday, January 29, 2012. (Al Seib/Los Angeles Times/MCT)

LOS ANGELES — The style stakes are heating up this red carpet season, and at the SAG Awards on Sunday night, it was the risks that paid off.

The sea of sameness we saw at the Golden Globes gave way to major individualized fashion statements.

Emma Stone’s dress — by Sarah Burton for Alexander McQueen — was a total knockout because of its “exploding lace” bustier, as the fashion house describes it; and the fresh, mid-calf length, all the better to showcase a killer pair of peep-toe shoes.

Michelle Williams’ red Valentino gown was distinguished by the twist of a one-shoulder bodice and short, red lace sleeves. The surprising ankle-length, cutaway hem showed off her red Roger Vivier cage sandals.

And when it came to details, Zoe Saldana’s white Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci gown, with its tank bodice under a sheer overlay and jeweled neckline, was unlike anything else out there.

But the biggest risk-taker was Rose Byrne, who dressed in a white Elie Saab jumpsuit. Her inspiration, she said, was the late 1970s/early ‘80s feel of the movie “Scarface,” and with her bob haircut, the ensemble worked in a kooky chic way.

As far as trends to take away, there were many shades of pale: Octavia Spencer’s gray Tadashi Shoji gown, Kristen Wiig’s yellow Balenciaga halter gown and Julianna Margulies’ dove gray Calvin Klein dress.

The goddess look was big, as evidenced by Viola Davis’ Marchesa strapless white Grecian chiffon gown with antique gold embroidery, Tilda Swinton’s pleated white jersey Lanvin gown and Angelina Jolie’s draped black metallic jersey Jenny Packham gown.

When it came to the extras, there were loads of unique jewelry, including Wiig’s 19th century diamond lattice Fred Leighton choker (a miss), Jolie’s striking vintage black and gold House of Lavande hoop earrings and bangle bracelet and Sofia Vergara’s bold Lorraine Schwartz amethyst cuff and earrings.

So it seems, not just any borrowed diamonds will do.

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