Music

Fall 2014 New Music Playlist (audio)

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PopMatters has 17 new songs plus notes to add to your fall soundtrack.

Catch up with the piles of colorful new music to rake up and add to this fall’s soundtrack. Bands such as Motopony, Bear In Heaven and Foxygen offer songs from solid follow-ups, while music scene stalwarts TV on the Radio and Cold War Kids return to drop more tunes into a vast archive. Solo artists Sondre Lerche, Ariel Pink and Jenny Lewis also appear on the playlist along with Dan Boeckner’s new band Operators. It’s a harvest to behold, so listen and enjoy.

Late Summer 2014 Playlist by JaneJS on Grooveshark

 

1. “Time Between” – Bear in Heaven

Brooklyn-based indie rock quartet Bear in Heaven just released its fourth studio album since 2003, Time Is Over One Day Old. “Time Between” offers a mix of handclaps, heavy percussion and pulsating synths layered with singer (and founder of the band) Jon Philpot’s seductive crooning.

2. “Kiss Me Again” – The Drums

The Drums is the musical project of childhood friends Jonathan Pierce and Jacob Graham, now living in Brooklyn. This indie pop confection, “Kiss Me Again”, is off their third studio album since 2005, Encyclopedia.

3. “Bad Law” – Sondre Lerche

Norwegian singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Sondre Lerche has added life experiences such as divorce to his sunny singing, allowing dissonance and expressive word play. “Bad Law” is the single from Please, his seventh full length album since 2001.

4. “Get Down (Come Up)” – Motopony

Seattle rock sextet Motopony has released a follow up to its 2011 self-titled debut with this solid single “Get Down (Come Up)”, part of an EP called Idle Beauty. Singer Daniel Blue brings an out of this world shaman approach to this soulful odyssey.

5. “Put Your Number In My Phone” – Ariel Pink

“Put Your Number In My Phone” is the single for L.A. artist Ariel Pink’s first album released as a solo artist, pom pom. His combination of wry lyrics and gauzy pop convictions laid the foundation for a new seven-piece band.

6. “Start Again” – Operators

Canadian Dan Boeckener (Wolf Parade, Handsome Furs and Divine Fits) has a new band, Operators, with an EP titled EP 1. His signature gritty vocals pour over the guitar-centric and hard rocking urgency of “Start Again.”

7. “All This Could Be Yours” – Cold War Kids

Indie rock quintet Cold War Kids of Long Beach, CA released its fifth album since 2004, called Hold My Home. “All This Could Be Yours” is the first single for the new collection, with singer Nathan Willet’s passionate delivery leading the way.

8. “Happy Idiot” – TV on the Radio

Brooklyn indie rock band TV on the Radio is ready to release its fifth studio album since 2001, Seeds. This teaser single, “Happy Idiot”, features Tunde Adebimpe’s smooth vocals riding above a pulsing soundscape.

9. “Sherman (Animals in the Jungle)” – Tom Vek

London multi-instrumentalist Tom Vek returns with a third album since 2005, Luck. His signature gravelly voice provides a sonic drive for the single, “Sherman (Animals in the Jungle).”

10. “Heartbeats” – September Girls

This quintet from Dublin mixes a '60s girl group vibe with '90s low-fi production and a punk rock attitude. “Heartbeats” is a single from the September Girls’ debut album, Cursing the Sea.

11. “Learning Slowly” – Purling Hiss

Philadelphia’s Mike Polizze has created a trail of albums as Purling Hiss; the latest is called Weirdon. “Learning Slowly” showcases the band’s confident grunge rock aesthetic: weaving guitars over a percussive backbone and buried vocals.

12. “Home (Leave the Lights On)” – Field Report

Christopher Porterfield formed alt folk band Field Report (an anagram of his name) a few years ago in Milwaukee, WI. The group just released its sophomore album, Marigolden, full of heartfelt melodies and soul-searching lyrics as found in “Home (Leave the Lights On).”

13. “How Can You Really” – Foxygen

Jonathan Rado and Sam France started band life together at age 15 in Agoura Hills, CA. “How Can You Really” is the first single from Foxygen’s third album since 2005, … And Star Power, highlighting the band's psych pop leanings and over-the-top musical indulgences.

14. “Just One of the Guys” – Jenny Lewis

L.A. singer/songwriter Jenny Lewis has released her third solo album, Voyager. As produced by Ryan Adams, sunny songs such as the single “Just One of the Guys” juxtapose a sweet delivery with searing lyrical content.

15. “Turkey Dog Coma” – Flying Lotus

Multi-genre electronic producer Flying Lotus (the stage name for L.A.’s Steven Ellison) has released You’re Dead!, his fourth album since 2001. This intricate tune, “Turkey Dog Coma”, demonstrates his fearless approach to composing music.

16. “Brasilia (feat. Giorgio Tuma)” – Populous

Populous is the musical project of Italian producer Andrea Mangia, who returns to this moniker after the side project Life & Limb. “Brasilia”, the closer for the new album Night Safari (the fourth since 2002), is a multi-layered composition with haunting vocals.

17. “Simple Science” – Zero 7

British duo Henry Binns and Sam Hardaker are back with an EP called Simple Science, their eighth release since 2001 as Zero 7. The title track weaves a tuneful web of sung melodies and multifaceted electronica.

Fall 2014 Playlist by JaneJS on Grooveshark

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