Music

The Henrys - "A Weaker One" (audio) (Premiere)

"A Weaker One" comes off of Quiet Industry, the first album in six years from the Toronto-based outfit the Henrys.

Don Rooke, the frontman of the Toronto-based folk outfit the Henrys, describes their sound as "old instruments -- new sounds." He's not wrong; although there's plenty of old-style folk to be heard in the band's music, due in large part to certain instrumental choices such as Rooke's historic Weissenborn and Kona lap steel guitars, they evoke plenty of current sonic architects as well. Rooke, in particular, evokes the stylings of maestros like Ry Cooder and Bill Frisell.

It's been six years since the Henrys have put out a full-length studio recording, but that time has now come to an end with Quiet Industry, their new LP. Below you can stream "A Weaker One", which begins as a seemingly simple folk tune that blossoms with a dissonant post-chorus section towards its conclusion.

Other players on Quiet Industry include Hugh Marsh (Bruce Cockburn, Don Byron, Jon Hassell), John Sheard (Stuart McLean, Rita Coolidge), Andrew Downing (Kelly Joe Phelps, David Tronzo), Davide DiRenzo (Holly Cole, Cassandra Wilson, Jacksoul), Jonathan Goldsmith (Jane Siberry, Nick Buzz, Sarah Slean), along with harmony vocalist Tara Dunphy (The Rizdales).

Rooke tells PopMatters, "This song is about a person who's down on his luck, and how relying on the help of another, rather than withdrawing, can be better for both of them. 'Trust the one beside to remember how it's done, and know that two is better than a weaker one.'"



Quiet Industry is out on 11 June through the Henrys' own imprint, hR2015.

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