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The Chemical Brothers – “Sometimes I Feel So Deserted” (video)

The Chemical Brothers release a zombie-driven music video makes for one of the darkest visual trips the group has taken us on.

Evan Sawdey: Make absolutely no mistake: Born in the Echoes is the best album the dance duo has released in over a decade, and features some of their finest pop moments ever (that Beck collaboration cures most diseases upon first listen). “Sometimes I Feel So Deserted” is a little bit run-of-the-mill ChemBro, and it’s zombie-driven music video makes for one of the darkest visual trips the group has taken us on. The builds are pretty typical for a Big Beat number like this, but at the end of the day, sometimes even lesser Chemical Brothers sounds better than most of the major dance music out there. [6/10]

Jordan Blum: Few artists have impacted electronic dance music as much as this British duo; however, this track doesn’t really impress on any level. It’s quite repetitive, cold, and unmelodic, with stagnant percussion, lifeless vocals, and plenty of irritating effects. The Chemical Brothers have done better work in the past, but every aspect of this piece is unappealing. In addition, many other acts, like Muse, Nine Inch Nails, and Pure Reason Revolution, have implemented the style with greater intrigue and creativity. [3/10]

Steve Horowitz: Okay, the track has a pleasant steady vibe and one can certainly dance to it Billy Idol style, by oneself. There’s not much else happening here, which is the song’s saving grace. Instead of making a grand statement about the fact that everyone is lonely, the music just suggests solitude. The repetitive beat compels one to get off one’s butt, but little else. The video has lots of cool effects and an ambiguous story line about oil and the human condition, not to mention a tin man and lots of petroleum. It’s more compelling than the song. [6/10]

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