Chris Barsanti

Chris Barsanti is a freelance writer, editor, consultant, and aspiring flâneur. A member of the National Book Critics Circle and the Online Film Critics Society, he has been published in the Chicago Tribune, The Hollywood Reporter, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Publishers Weekly, and Rain Taxi Review of Books, among other outlets. His books include Six Seasons and a Movie: How Community Broke Television, Monty Python FAQ, The Ballot Box: 10 Presidential Elections That Changed American History, and The Sci-Fi Movie Guide.
Ben Affleck’s Nike/Michael Jordan Film ‘Air’ Tries to Elevate Marketing

Ben Affleck’s Nike/Michael Jordan Film ‘Air’ Tries to Elevate Marketing

Ben Affleck’s ridiculously crowd-pleasing Jerry Maguire-like movie Air, about Nike landing Michael Jordan, makes a nearly too-late pivot into meaningful marketing.

‘John Wick: Chapter 4’ Goes Down Shooting

‘John Wick: Chapter 4’ Goes Down Shooting

Despite an egregious running time and padded plot, the (maybe) conclusion to Keanu Reeves’ series, John Wick: Chapter 4, still serves up some of the original’s delightful weirdness.

Tahiti-Set Drama ‘Pacifiction’ Toys with Power Plays in Paradise

Tahiti-Set Drama ‘Pacifiction’ Toys with Power Plays in Paradise

Albert Serra’s Tahiti-set drama Pacification submerges an espionage plot in an off-kilter portrait of a French official situated between the colonizers and the colonized.

The High Before the Fall: Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Adventures of Baron Munchausen’

The High Before the Fall: Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Adventures of Baron Munchausen’

Stranger than Terry Gilliam’s 1990s hits and less aggressive than his later work, the glorious fantasy The Adventures of Baron Munchausen was the last film where his talents fully flowered.

‘Living’ Rages Ever So Properly Against the Dying of the Light

‘Living’ Rages Ever So Properly Against the Dying of the Light

Oliver Hermanus’ Living, a faithful remake of Akira Kurosawa’s Ikiru, stars Bill Nighy as a terminally ill repressed bureaucrat who realizes it’s time to rage against the dying of the light.

Hollywood Is a Helluva Drug in Damien Chazelle’s ‘Babylon’

Hollywood Is a Helluva Drug in Damien Chazelle’s ‘Babylon’

Margot Robbie and Brad Pitt’s characters burn the candle at both ends in Damien Chazelle’s rollicking and ridiculous epic cautionary tale, Babylon.

‘White Noise’ Is a Pop Art Fever Dream of Catastrophe and Consumerism

‘White Noise’ Is a Pop Art Fever Dream of Catastrophe and Consumerism

Noah Baumbach’s bright, funny, and nervy White Noise vividly translates Don DeLillo’s classic of mid-1980s American consumerist-medicated anxieties.

Could Longtermism Cause Short-Term Damage?

Could Longtermism Cause Short-Term Damage?

William MacAskill’s What We Owe the Future is an audacious plea to help our future humans with longtermism thinking, but it is blind to what we need now.

Riveting ‘Retrograde’ Makes Warfare in Afghanistan Personal

Riveting ‘Retrograde’ Makes Warfare in Afghanistan Personal

Matthew Heineman’s dizzying documentary, Retrograde, sees the fall of Afghanistan through the eyes of one beleaguered Afghan general.

The Elites Who Are Just So Over Humanity

The Elites Who Are Just So Over Humanity

The depth of anti-humanist sentiment related by Douglas Rushkoff in his latest book, Survival of the Richest, is harrowing and illuminating.

Punk Rock Documentary ‘Nightclubbing’ Gives Max’s Kansas City Its Due

Punk Rock Documentary ‘Nightclubbing’ Gives Max’s Kansas City Its Due

Danny Garcia’s chaotic, discursive documentary Nightclubbing, argues that Max’s Kansas City, not CBGB’s, was the true font of American punk rock.

‘The Forgiven’ Looks Starkly at Cynicism and World-Weary Outrage

‘The Forgiven’ Looks Starkly at Cynicism and World-Weary Outrage

What happens in the stories within The Forgiven is predictable and yet compelling, due largely to the stark dialogue and McDonagh’s anti-romantic viewpoint.