Davi Caro

Davi Caro is a writer with a Journalism major, a past-life as a drummer, a penchant for comic books and '80s synthpop and a severe case of hipster complex. His interests lie (mostly) in culture and epecially music from all corners of the world.
‘Foreign Land’ and the Dawn of a New Age in Brazilian Cinema

‘Foreign Land’ and the Dawn of a New Age in Brazilian Cinema

The bleakness in Walter Salles and Daniela Thomas’ 1995 crime thriller Foreign Land would mark the film as a paragon in the newly emerging Brazilian cinema.

The Legacy of Caetano Veloso’s Masterpiece ‘Transa’

The Legacy of Caetano Veloso’s Masterpiece ‘Transa’

Brazilian singer Caetano Veloso’s most celebrated work, Transa, still resonates with audiences young and old 50 years later.

‘Doble Vida’ at 35: Soda Stereo’s Great Consolidation in Perspective

‘Doble Vida’ at 35: Soda Stereo’s Great Consolidation in Perspective

When Soda Stereo’s Doble Vida reached the hands of their fervorous fans, it was clear: the boys wanted to make it big – even bigger than they already were.

Dancing Post-Pinochet to Los Prisioneros’ ‘Corazones’

Dancing Post-Pinochet to Los Prisioneros’ ‘Corazones’

Los Prisioneros evolved from a politicized youthful New Wave sound to a synthpop-infused dynamic that would propel the trio to post-Pinochet stardom.

Biopic of Argentine Musician Fito Páez Immerses Viewers

Biopic of Argentine Musician Fito Páez Immerses Viewers

Biopic Fito Páez: El Amor Después Del Amor (Love After Music) is, among other things, a gateway into Argentina’s most celebrated rock star’s songbook.

Masterpiece or Mess? Reevaluating DC Comic’s ‘Doomsday Clock’

Masterpiece or Mess? Reevaluating DC Comic’s ‘Doomsday Clock’

Understanding the appeal of Doomsday Clock has nothing to do with it being a good or bad comics series. The real question is: does it matter?

‘Clics Modernos’ at 40: Charly García’s Problematic Post-Modern Masterpiece

‘Clics Modernos’ at 40: Charly García’s Problematic Post-Modern Masterpiece

With Clics Modernos, Charly García veered away from overt political commentary in favor of taking it to the dance floor. Puzzled fans – even the album cover screamed post-modernism – didn’t hold back their outrage.