Sarah Boslaugh

Sarah Boslaugh is a tutor in mathematics, chemistry, and biology at Forest Park Community College in St. Louis, Missouri, and is the movies editor for the popular culture publication TheArtSTL (www.theartsstl.com). In a previous life she worked as a statistician and technical programmer, primarily in the fields of medicine and public health. Her books include Statistics in a Nutshell (O'Reilly), Secondary Data Sources for Public Health (Cambridge University Press), Healthcare Systems Around the World: A Comparative Guide (Sage), and Transgender Health Issues (ABC-Clio).
‘Prison Movies’ Is a Serious Attempt to Define a Genre and Identify Its Key Characteristics

‘Prison Movies’ Is a Serious Attempt to Define a Genre and Identify Its Key Characteristics

While some historians classify prison films as offshoots of the gangster film, Kehrwald sees the prison film as relating more closely to social problem films and melodramas.
‘Hokusai x Manga’ Explores the Roots of Manga

‘Hokusai x Manga’ Explores the Roots of Manga

Hokusai x Manga traces the influence of popular Japanese visual art from the 17th-century to contemporary manga.

A Breezy Visit With Arthur Conan Doyle and His Most Famous Creation

A Breezy Visit With Arthur Conan Doyle and His Most Famous Creation

With Arthur and Sherlock, Michael Sims seeks to answer how Arthur Conan Doyle went from modestly successful physician to world-famous writer of detective stories.
‘A Little History of Economics’ Provides a Charming Overview of the Dismal Science

‘A Little History of Economics’ Provides a Charming Overview of the Dismal Science

Niall Kishtainy, writing for a general audience, provides a breezy stroll through economic thought, from Plato to Thomas Piketty.
It’s Apple’s World, Just Click and Agree to It

It’s Apple’s World, Just Click and Agree to It

Ever wonder what you agree to when you click on the terms and conditions for iTunes? Read R. Sikoryak's Terms and Conditions and be awakened.
‘Tharlo’ Is a Slow-moving Allegory About Innocence lost

‘Tharlo’ Is a Slow-moving Allegory About Innocence lost

Pema Tseden's Tharlo presents an allegory of Tibet and China in the guise of a film noir story set in Thailand
‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ Is Extraordinary in Its Depiction of Tenant Farmers

‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ Is Extraordinary in Its Depiction of Tenant Farmers

In a world of absolutes and cruel consequences, if an entire family’s future is destroyed due to the cutting of a single tree, then that’s simply how things are.
This Graphic Novel Adaptation of ‘Kindred’ Is Made Awkward With KLOKs! and CHOOMs!

This Graphic Novel Adaptation of ‘Kindred’ Is Made Awkward With KLOKs! and CHOOMs!

If you’ve never read any of Octavia E. Butler's works, Kindred is a good place to start, but this version is a little too manga for such a serious work.
The Power of Created Stories in Ivan Coyote’s ‘Tomboy Survival Guide’

The Power of Created Stories in Ivan Coyote’s ‘Tomboy Survival Guide’

Ivan Coyote's Tomboy Survival Guide is full of well-told tales about growing up transgender in the Yukon.
‘The Case of Alan Turing’ Gives the Enigma Project the Graphic Treatment

‘The Case of Alan Turing’ Gives the Enigma Project the Graphic Treatment

This treatment focuses not just on the technical matters of encryption, but also on the human factors that may prove decisive in breaking a code.
Animation: It’s Not Just for Children, Anymore

Animation: It’s Not Just for Children, Anymore

Maureen Furniss’ inclusive approach in A New History of Animation will have you discovering the work of new animators and new works by artists already familiar to you.

Ingrid Bergman in Her Own Words

Ingrid Bergman in Her Own Words

A portrait of a woman who succeeded in the film industry despite playing by her own rules.