Games

Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast: Another Princess, Another Boss Battle

Sure, there's Shadows of the Colossus and Titan Souls, but is the boss fight still relevant to contemporary video games?

In next week's all new episode of the Moving Pixels podcast, we'll be looking at Jotun. Somewhat in the vein of Shadows of the Colossus or Titan Souls, Jotun is a game that is all about the boss battle.

With that in mind, I thought it would be fun to revisit a discussion that Nick Dinicola, Rick Dakan, and myself had about the relevance or possible irrelevance of the boss fight to contemporary video games.

This podcast is also available via Soundcloud.

Additionally, we are also available on iTunes.

The year in song reflected the state of the world around us. Here are the 70 songs that spoke to us this year.

70. The Horrors - "Machine"

On their fifth album V, the Horrors expand on the bright, psychedelic territory they explored with Luminous, anchoring the ten new tracks with retro synths and guitar fuzz freakouts. "Machine" is the delicious outlier and the most vitriolic cut on the record, with Faris Badwan belting out accusations to the song's subject, who may even be us. The concept of alienation is nothing new, but here the Brits incorporate a beautiful metaphor of an insect trapped in amber as an illustration of the human caught within modernity. Whether our trappings are technological, psychological, or something else entirely makes the statement all the more chilling. - Tristan Kneschke

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This has been a remarkable year for shoegaze. If it were only for the re-raising of two central pillars of the initial scene it would still have been enough, but that wasn't even the half of it.

It hardly needs to be said that the last 12 months haven't been everyone's favorite, but it does deserve to be noted that 2017 has been a remarkable year for shoegaze. If it were only for the re-raising of two central pillars of the initial scene it would still have been enough, but that wasn't even the half of it. Other longtime dreamers either reappeared or kept up their recent hot streaks, and a number of relative newcomers established their place in what has become one of the more robust rock subgenre subcultures out there.

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Theatre

​'The Ferryman': Ephemeral Ideas, Eternal Tragedies

The current cast of The Ferryman in London's West End. Photo by Johan Persson. (Courtesy of The Corner Shop)

Staggeringly multi-layered, dangerously fast-paced and rich in characterizations, dialogue and context, Jez Butterworth's new hit about a family during the time of Ireland's the Troubles leaves the audience breathless, sweaty and tearful, in a nightmarish, dry-heaving haze.

"Vanishing. It's a powerful word, that"

Northern Ireland, Rural Derry, 1981, nighttime. The local ringleader of the Irish Republican Army gun-toting comrades ambushes a priest and tells him that the body of one Seamus Carney has been recovered. It is said that the man had spent a full ten years rotting in a bog. The IRA gunslinger, Muldoon, orders the priest to arrange for the Carney family not to utter a word of what had happened to the wretched man.

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9

It's Chris Stapleton's grasp on the constant joys in life despite the troubles that makes his music essential and enduring.

This was a year in which it seemed everybody wanted to put out more than one album. From Future's back-to-back releases to King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard's four (maybe five coming?) LPs, hyperactivity has been a definite key to success in our hyper-saturated music market. And although this marketing trick has seen most of its use in the hip-hop market, Chris Stapleton is here to show that it's just as effective in the country scene as anywhere. Just seven months removed from From A Room, Vol. 1, the ragged-bearded outlaw bard is back with another 32 minutes of heartbreak, folk storytelling, and of course, staggering vocal chops.

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8

Nowhere else in the merging of modern cinema and film criticism can you find such a strangely symbiotic relationship.

Both Roger Ebert and Werner Herzog are such idiosyncratically iconoclastic giants in their respective fields that it's very likely the world will never see an adequate replacement for each. While Herzog continues to follow his own singular artistic vision, the world has since lost the wit and wisdom of Ebert, arguably the last of the truly great film critics and custodians of the sacred medium. Between the two it becomes clear that there was an unremarked upon but nonetheless present mutual respect and admiration. Though here it tends to come off far more one-sided, save the opening transcript of a workshop held at the Facets Multimedia Center in Chicago in 1979 hosted by Ebert and featured Herzog and a handful of later interviews, there still comes through in their dialogue a meeting of like-minded, thoughtful individuals with a great love for the cinema and exploring the extremes of human creativity.

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