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Love in the Time of Coronavirus

Will COVID-19 Kill Movie Theaters?

Streaming services and large TV screens have really hurt movie theaters and now the coronavirus pandemic has shuttered multiplexes and arthouses. The author of The Perils of Moviegoing in America, however, is optimistic.

Gary D. Rhodes, Ph.D

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Hope Sandoval's Quiet Rebellion Against the Music Industry

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Film

How Jon Favreau's 'Iron Man 2' Peaks -- Then Crashes

Tony spends the first half of the film worrying about his legacy but also trying to have fun with the time he has left. It's rather like MCU's superhero film challenges of the time.

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Can 'Star Wars' Be Saved?

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