Film

Critical Confessions: Part 5 - The Same Page?

When it happens, it's rather unsettling. In debate, we call it "squirreling". In society, it's known as being 'out of step' or 'rebellious'. It's never easy being the odd man out in any critical consensus. We all know the feeling of championing a band or artist who others hate, and visa versa. Yet in the world of film reviewing, such an outsider stance often results in feelings of inadequacy and incompetence. There's also a sense of seniority at play, a deference to those who've done the job longer than others. The old guard gets the benefit of the doubt, so to speak, while the newer members are viewed through a novice scrim of suspiciousness.

It is a rare occurrence, but the examples are very telling indeed. Last month, Be Kind Rewind premiered. Michel Gondry's love letter to home video and the DIY spirit of the new medium technology was uniformly undervalued by critics, many complaining that the story seemed shallow and scattered. Yet to these supposedly trained eyes right here, Rewind was genius. It extolled the value of VHS while proving that film becomes a social language all its own. During the public/press screening, you could literally feel the shrinking sense of perspective. While others in the journalist's row scoffed and shifted in their seats, one or two of their number were transfixed - and taken in - by Gondry's efforts.

Or take the upcoming Funny Games. A near shot by shot remake of Michael Haneke's 1997 film of the same name, this twisted tale of a wealthy family brutalized by some very unusual killers is as smarmy and smug as it is distasteful and vile. It has nothing but contempt for the audience, purposefully tosses convention to the window, and more or less acts as an egotistical deconstruction of the whole thriller genre. Some have really connected with this film, calling it brave, bold, and masterful. But at the private screening held for press, there was only one critic who felt the same.

You could tell which one it was. He laughed at all the lame observational satire and seemed to connect with the confrontational style Haneke was preaching. During the more static bits, when bored viewers (like yours truly) looked around for some manner of diversion, you could see the man enraptured by what he was seeing. As the credits rolled and the group wandered out, the comments were harsh:

"Reprehensible!"

"Atrocious"

"Just plain bad"

"Pointless! Just pointless."

"A repugnant piece of sh*t"

And circumventing the bile, making his way past those who wanted an additional moment with the monitor to express their disgust, the odd man out successfully skirted detection. Days later, at another event, a random comment about Funny Games elicited a sigh from said individual. Clearly, he 'got' what Haneke was supposedly selling. The rest were, apparently, just grumpy stuffed shirts.

Being the filmic freak can make you feel that way. This past year, the remake of Halloween and JJ Abrams experimental Cloverfield both struck massive love/hate chords with audiences. From this reviewer's perspective, both films were excellent. This didn't mean that he was praised for his honesty or challenged on his choice. No, most of the feedback was downright rude and abrasive. Profanity laced missives were the norm, as were blatant challenges to one's credentials. Since a critic lives and dies by his or her opinion, such attacks are routine. But it's interesting to see how many premise their putdowns on the sole basis of having a differing or direct opposite judgment than there's.

Dealing with one's peers doesn't make it any easier or different. Around Oscar time, a conversation about The Savages started up (as an outgrowth of Juno's predetermined Academy win). Many in the room found it thought provoking, intense, sadly funny, and moving without being overly dramatic. They argued their case well, supporting their positions with actual evidence of dialogue remembered, specific scenes, and how close to home the film finally hit. Yet this critic was on the outside looking far, far in. He was harangued for not finding Laura Linney 'amazing'. He was questioned as to why he thought the scripting was weak (answer: it didn't seem real). And he was routinely disputed as being outside the mainstream in this regard.

It takes a certain type of stamina to do this week after week, to watch one mediocre Hollywood hack job after another with only your wits and your writing skills as a buffer. You recognize immediately upon liking or disliking a movie that you'll be up against a certain consensus and may indeed find yourself walking a certain belief corridor by yourself. There's no doubt that a critic has to develop a resilient spine, a keen wit, and a Helluva thick skin. It's impossible to survive otherwise. Just the hate email alone would be enough to undermine even the heartiest sense of scholarship. Remember, most journalists came into film because it was a passion - something they studied either as a curriculum or as a fan. There's no real tendency to shoot from the hip, even when they may want to.

On the other hand, most opposing viewpoints come from passion. They are perfectly appropriate and still highly irrational reactions. Funny Games wasn't bad because it blatantly revised the way we are supposed to look at violence on film. It had major directing, acting, and scripting flaws as well. Yet sometimes, those issues are absent in the "squirrel". For them, the link is so thoughtful and profound that all the other problems seem petty. How many times have you read a review where a critic clearly says "Factor 'X' was so powerful that it helped get the audience through Faults 'A', 'B', and 'C'?" That's the magic and mystery of movies at play.

Certainly there is a sound guilty pleasure in being the odd duck, the squeaky wheel amongst the Kool-aid consuming rabble. Take Borat, for example. At the time, everyone thought of it as the second coming of cinematic comedy. Sacha Baron Cohen was being anointed as the new mock-doc king, and his work was actually being offered for Awards consideration. In more than one piece, yours truly took both the film and the actor to task, suggesting that he was really just an emperor pretender with a new set of snarky clothes. A little over a year later, the backlash has equalized the original praise. Now, what seemed dull witted and worn out has become somewhat prescient and pretty much on the money.

Still, that doesn't make it any easier. During the press screening for No Country for Old Men, there were several audible groans when the still considered controversial ending finally played out. Several in the select crowd actually went so far as to suggest the film was ruined by the unconventional finale. It's an argument that still, rages all across messageboards and fansites. Yet the Coens went on to capture several Academy Awards last month, an unscientific suggestion that perhaps some in the voting pool got their approach. That won't silence the reviewing rebel - and perhaps it shouldn't. It's important to remember this, however - critics don't purposefully buck the trend just to be different. Everyone's opinion is valid, even if it's not on the same page as yours.

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