Film

Friday Film Focus - 13 June, 2008

Feel that heat? Summer is really starting to fire up. For 13 June, here are the films in focus:

The Incredible Hulk [rating: 7]

It has to be said that one of the most "incredible" things about this so-called reinvention of the Hulk is how close it is to Ang Lee's vision.

When Marvel made the decision to take over the "creative direction" of the big screen adaptations of their characters, geek nation remained skeptical. After all, just because the company knows comic books doesn't mean it understands the cinematic translations of same. Luckily, Iron Man has quelled a great many of those fears. It stands as Summer 2008's greatest surprise. Now, hot on the heels of that success comes the reboot of the Incredible Hulk. Yes, Ang Lee already made this movie five years ago, but none except a few clued in critics enjoyed its psychologically-oriented narrative. No, what devotees wanted was a big green giant (and accompanying action "smashing") they could comprehend and champion. This time around, they more or less got their wish. read full review...

Bigger, Stronger, Faster* [rating: 9]

...if anyone wants to have a serious discussion about the entire supplement situation, this excellent film is a good place to start.

Steroids - the word alone strikes fear in the hearts of sports fans and athletes alike. Thirty years ago, the anabolic hormone replacement therapy was a common, under the counter practice. Everyone from bodybuilders to professional football players hit the 'juice' as a means of getting bigger, training harder, and repairing physical damage faster. Such notable superstars as Arnold Schwarzenegger and Hulk Hogan admitted to using the substance to gain that all important competitive advantage over others. But somewhere along the last three decades, steroids stopped being subterranean cool. They went from an accepted unspoken supplement to international pariah. In his masterful, sly documentary Bigger, Stronger, Faster, former power lifter Chris Bell discusses when he thinks the perception changed, and how little change such renewed awareness has actually brought about. read full review...

Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired [rating: 9]

Roman Polanski deserves his badge of dishonor, no question about it. This amazing documentary argues that others need to start sporting one as well.

Ask any casual film fan about Roman Polanski, the brilliant Polish moviemaker responsible for '70s classics like Rosemary's Baby and Chinatown, and you're likely to get the following response: "Wasn't he the guy who raped that girl and then ran off to Europe to avoid prosecution?" Indeed, eight years to the day that his beautiful wife, Sharon Tate, was murdered in the Helter Skelter rampage of Charlie Manson and his family, the director was to be placed on trial for the seduction, drugging, and 'he said/she said' sexual encounter with a 13 year old girl. At the time, it was a true tabloid sensation, a circus wrapped inside the most sizzling of scandals. Today, it's a story relegated to the above-mentioned gross overgeneralization. Thanks to Marina Zenovich's brilliant new documentary, Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired, the closest thing to the truth finally gets a much needed airing. read full review...

Other Releases -- In Brief

The Happening [rating: 2]

Newsweek Magazine must still be smarting. Back in 2002, as Signs was gearing up for its box office assault, the publication called M. Night Shyamalan "The Next Spielberg". Aside from the bald audacity of such a claim, the Indian born filmmaker had only made three films previous. Sure, The Sixth Sense was very good, and Unbreakable perhaps even better, but even the writer/director dismissed his first feature film, Wide Awake, as a failure. Still, many found the periodical's claim to have some minor merit. With what he had accomplished in such a short time, Shyamalan looked like the real deal. Now he looks like garbage.The Happeningis destined to go down as either the kitschiest camp trick ever played on an audience by a former A-list filmmaker, or the last gasp in a career downward spiral so massive that Trent Reznor would be jealous. It takes a bad b-movie ideal, dresses it up in fancy framing and composition, and asks us to believe in its Bert I. Gordon goofiness. Even worse, it doesn't appear that Shyamalan is simply having a laugh. Pre-publicity has commented on how the director is excited to give fans his first "R-rated" horror film. In interviews, he seems to genuinely believe that this will be a solid scarefest. Clearly, Lady in the Water wasn't the only delusion this non-autuer suffered from.


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