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Film

Friday Film Focus - 23 May, 2008

The Summer onslaught continues, and for the weekend beginning 23 May, here are the films in focus:

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull [rating: 8]

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull is clearly a movie geared toward anyone under the age of 30 who memorized every moment of their Raiders VHS.

Icons earn their status by never changing. What they represented the moment they gained said mythos remains steadfast and sturdy, with only occasional minor alterations along the way. This is why it's never wise to revisit a symbol, cinematic or otherwise. The moment you do, the carefully constructed barriers you built around the legend start to shatter. Unless you're out to really revise (or even implode) the idol, what was once beloved is never quite the same. For many, this is exactly what happened when George Lucas decided to go back to his Star Wars universe. Well established - and beloved - characters like Darth Vader and Yoda were systematically reconfigured to fit a new, and not necessarily complimentary, ideal.

read full review...

For another view on the latest Indiana Jones film, read Chris Barsanti's Short Take:

read full review...

Postal [rating: 4]

Indeed, Postal is THAT kind of movie, one that substitutes rancor for real wit, that utilizes splatter when a few script rewrites would have worked much better.

Uwe Boll is no longer just a filmmaker. He's become a cultural icon of the whipping boy variety. Granted, he's earned every inch of his horrid hack status. Anyone who has sat through Bloodrayne, Alone in the Dark, House of the Dead, or his recent In the Name of the King understands this. But to totally dismiss him as Ed Wood's Teutonic twin does both men a massive disservice. After all, Mr. Glen or Glenda was working with a no budget handicap. Boll makes his cinematic affronts with the full faith and credit of his homeland's moneysaving tax laws. Postal is his latest videogame based endeavor. As a motion picture, it's garbage. But as a statement of the rest of the film loving world, it's a gloriously tasteless middle finger. read full review...

War, Inc. [rating: 5]

The politics of War, Inc. are not problematic so much as pedestrian. There's nothing new in embracing the anti-conservative screed to show how off kilter the country really is.

Quick - name the last really successful political satire? Was it Wag the Dog? Man of the Year? American Dreamz? Primary Colors? Perhaps you have to go back as far as the Watergate among nuns fun known as Nasty Habits. Whatever the case, the War in Iraq and the Bush Administration's policies toward same should be rife for some rib-tickling ridicule. Of course, some of the decisions and resulting failures are sad/funny enough to be their own pragmatic parodies. Yet instead of taking on the Commander in Chief and his wayward conservatism, most films about the current situation in the Middle East have focused on the military, and how it turns dedicated voluntaries into outright, detestable villains.read full review...

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