Music

Gia Woods Enters 2020 with Scream-Along Banger, "HUNGRY"

Photo: Sabrina Miller / Courtesy of the artist

Gia Woods' new single "HUNGRY" is a total whirlwind, an aggressive, snarling scream-along that clocks in at just under two minutes and demands to be replayed.

From "Bitch Better Have My Money" to "Womanizer", the great pop tradition of women finally reaching their snapping point essentially never gets old. It's always a reliable well of career-defining songs and iconic visual moments. "HUNGRY", the new single from LA-based newcomer Gia Woods, is one of those moments. After releasing a slew of smooth and flirty bangers in 2019, she's currently prepping her next project Cut Season, a collection of confident, aggressive tracks that are all about coming out from under pressure and toxicity.

"HUNGRY", which is out today, is a total whirlwind -- an aggressive, snarling scream-along that's somewhere between "I Love It" and "Just a Girl", and clocking in at just under two minutes, demands to be replayed. We spoke to Gia about her inspirations for the track, and on what fans can expect in 2020.

Compared to your earlier work, "HUNGRY" comes off as clearly more aggressive and defiant. What made you want to channel that energy? Can we expect more of it on your upcoming project?

I wrote "HUNGRY" during this crazy time where so much was changing in my life, and I felt really fed up and exhausted by toxic energies that I was around at the time. A lot of the songs on Cut Season were written during that time, so you'll definitely be hearing more of a confident sound. I've been involved in the project from production to writing, to visuals. So, I'm excited to put this all out into the world soon.

What else is on the horizon for Cut Season? Are there any artists, albums, or sounds that inspired you directly while you were working on it?

While I was writing, I was listening to a lot of Radiohead, No Doubt, Kanye, and specifically wanting the whole EP to feel like a story beginning to end. I just saw so many visuals behind it when I wrote "Cut Season", and I immediately envisioned how I wanted to start the live shows, and all the other songs started to come together.

The "HUNGRY" video is, graciously, in the great tradition of Loser Guys Getting Their Ass Beat. Did you have any specific visual references in mind when making the video?

Honestly, not really! It was just a loose narrative, but I wanted to be intentional in having each character confidently doing their own thing on their own terms.

How do you feel you've grown as an artist between your early singles and "HUNGRY"? What was the biggest challenge or doubt along the way?

My singles up to this point have been one-off releases and tell a snippet of a story. Whereas "HUNGRY" is so much more than that. It's kicking off a bigger story and a full project that I've created. So I feel like I've grown so much, and I feel inspired to share more of myself in an album-format instead of just releasing singles. It's hard to get to know an artist that way. And I'm an album kind of listener, so I'm excited to get to show more of my world.

Where's the best place for someone to listen to this song for the first time?

Blast it in your car at the highest volume.

* * *

"HUNGRY" is out on all platforms today.

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