TV

Globe predictions: Michael C. Hall, John Lithgow, Jane Lynch should have speeches ready

Hal Boedeker
The Orlando Sentinel (MCT)

You may hate awards shows, but the participation of Ricky Gervais as host could make for a funny and unpredictable Golden Globes this Sunday.

Gervais is a brilliant, risk-taking comedian. Just how feisty will he be at the Globes? That could be the night's biggest mystery. The awards start at 8 p.m. EST Sunday.

The celebrities like to party at the Globes, and these awards bring together television and movies. On the TV side, the races have clear front-runners.

Drama series: It's a race between "Mad Men" and "Dexter." Showtime's serial killer probably has the edge. The other nominees are Fox's "House" and two from HBO, "Big Love" and "True Blood."

Comedy series: Globe voters love newcomers, and Fox's "Glee" is the charming freshman that should take the prize. The other nominees are NBC's "30 Rock" and "The Office," ABC's "Modern Family" and HBO's "Entourage."

Dramatic actor: Michael C. Hall should triumph in what will be a big night for "Dexter." His victory could be a dramatic moment. Earlier this week, Hall revealed that he has been battling cancer. The other nominees are Jon Hamm of "Mad Men," Hugh Laurie of "House," Simon Baker of "The Mentalist" and Bill Paxton of "Big Love."

Dramatic actress: Julianna Margulies is the main reason "The Good Wife" has become a hit for CBS. Look for her at the podium. The other nominees are Glenn Close of "Damages," Anna Paquin of "True Blood," January Jones of "Mad Men" and Kyra Sedgwick of "The Closer."

Comedy actor: Matthew Morrison is crucial to the appeal of "Glee," and he sings beautifully, too. He would be my pick, and I think the Hollywood Foreign Press Association will pick him, too. The other nominees are Alec Baldwin of "30 Rock," Steve Carell of "The Office," David Duchovny of "Californication" and Thomas Jane of "Hung."

Comedy actress: Edie Falco of "Nurse Jackie" probably earned the best reviews of any actor last year on television. She seems the likely victor, but she faces strong competition from Toni Collette of "United States of Tara." The other nominees are Tina Fey of "30 Rock," Lea Michele of "Glee" and Courteney Cox of "Cougar Town."

The supporting categories lump comedy, drama and movie performances together. The supporting actor winner seems a no-brainer: John Lithgow for "Dexter." His fellow nominees are Jeremy Piven of "Entourage," Neil Patrick Harris of "How I Met Your Mother," William Hurt of "Damages" and Michael Emerson of "Lost."

Jane Lynch is the knockout performer on "Glee," and she should win supporting actress. Her fellow nominees are Jane Adams of "Hung," Rose Byrne of "Damages," Janet McTeer of "Into the Storm" and Chloe Sevigny of "Big Love."

The nominees for best TV movie or miniseries are Lifetime's "Georgia O'Keeffe," PBS' "Little Dorrit" and three from HBO, "Taking Chance," "Grey Gardens" and "Into the Storm." Look for the Globes to honor "Grey Gardens," although "Little Dorrit" is most deserving.

The nominees for TV movie actress are Drew Barrymore and Jessica Lange for "Grey Gardens," Joan Allen for "Georgia O'Keeffe," Anna Paquin for "The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler" and Sigourney Weaver for "Prayers for Bobby." Lange won the Emmy for her role, and look for her to repeat.

The nominees for TV movie actor are Kevin Bacon for "Taking Chance," Kenneth Branagh for "Wallander: One Step Behind," Chiwetel Ejiofor for "Endgame," Jeremy Irons for "Georgia O'Keeffe" and Brendan Gleeson for "Into the Storm." Gleeson won the Emmy for his towering performance as Winston Churchill; he will repeat at the Globes.

Here are this movie fan's picks on the film side: "Avatar," Jeff Bridges and Carey Mulligan in dramatic categories; "(500) Days of Summer," Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Meryl Streep (for "Julie & Julia") in comedy categories; Mo'Nique and Christoph Waltz in supporting categories; James Cameron for director.

In the wake of Malcolm Young's passing, Jesse Fink, author of The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC, offers up his top 10 AC/DC songs, each seasoned with a dash of backstory.

In the wake of Malcolm Young's passing, Jesse Fink, author of The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC, offers up his top 10 AC/DC songs, each seasoned with a dash of backstory.

Keep reading... Show less

Pauline Black may be called the Queen of Ska by some, but she insists she's not the only one, as Two-Tone legends the Selecter celebrate another stellar album in a career full of them.

Being commonly hailed as the "Queen" of a genre of music is no mean feat, but for Pauline Black, singer/songwriter of Two-Tone legends the Selecter and universally recognised "Queen of Ska", it is something she seems to take in her stride. "People can call you whatever they like," she tells PopMatters, "so I suppose it's better that they call you something really good!"

Keep reading... Show less

Morrison's prose is so engaging and welcoming that it's easy to miss the irreconcilable ambiguities that are set forth in her prose as ineluctable convictions.

It's a common enough gambit in science fiction. Humans come across a race of aliens that appear to be entirely alike and yet one group of said aliens subordinates the other, visiting violence upon their persons, denigrating them openly and without social or legal consequence, humiliating them at every turn. The humans inquire why certain of the aliens are subjected to such degradation when there are no discernible differences among the entire race of aliens, at least from the human point of view. The aliens then explain that the subordinated group all share some minor trait (say the left nostril is oh-so-slightly larger than the right while the "superior" group all have slightly enlarged right nostrils)—something thatm from the human vantage pointm is utterly ridiculous. This minor difference not only explains but, for the alien understanding, justifies the inequitable treatment, even the enslavement of the subordinate group. And there you have the quandary of Otherness in a nutshell.

Keep reading... Show less
3

A 1996 classic, Shawn Colvin's album of mature pop is also one of best break-up albums, comparable lyrically and musically to Joni Mitchell's Hejira and Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks.

When pop-folksinger Shawn Colvin released A Few Small Repairs in 1996, the music world was ripe for an album of sharp, catchy songs by a female singer-songwriter. Lilith Fair, the tour for women in the music, would gross $16 million in 1997. Colvin would be a main stage artist in all three years of the tour, playing alongside Liz Phair, Suzanne Vega, Sheryl Crow, Sarah McLachlan, Meshell Ndegeocello, Joan Osborne, Lisa Loeb, Erykah Badu, and many others. Strong female artists were not only making great music (when were they not?) but also having bold success. Alanis Morissette's Jagged Little Pill preceded Colvin's fourth recording by just 16 months.

Keep reading... Show less
9

Frank Miller locates our tragedy and warps it into his own brutal beauty.

In terms of continuity, the so-called promotion of this entry as Miller's “third" in the series is deceptively cryptic. Miller's mid-'80s limited series The Dark Knight Returns (or DKR) is a “Top 5 All-Time" graphic novel, if not easily “Top 3". His intertextual and metatextual themes resonated then as they do now, a reason this source material was “go to" for Christopher Nolan when he resurrected the franchise for Warner Bros. in the mid-00s. The sheer iconicity of DKR posits a seminal work in the artist's canon, which shares company with the likes of Sin City, 300, and an influential run on Daredevil, to name a few.

Keep reading... Show less
8
Pop Ten
Mixed Media
PM Picks

© 1999-2017 Popmatters.com. All rights reserved.
Popmatters is wholly independently owned and operated.

rating-image