Reviews

Hitch (2005)

Cynthia Fuchs

Hitch's combination of expertise and endearing clumsiness makes use of a few too many clichés.


Hitch

Director: Andy Tennant
Cast: Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Amber Valletta, Kevin James
MPAA rating: PG-13
Studio: Columbia
First date: 2005
US DVD Release Date: 2005-06-14
A lot of the early Hitchisms came from my research, literally reading all these women's magazines that said, "Eight out of 10 women will tell them everything that they need to know about a relationship."
-- Andy Tennant, "The Dating Experts"

I'm saying that you are an iceberg in that 90% of your mass is below the surface.
-- Hitch (Will Smith), Hitch

The Hitch DVD lists a number of extras, none so fun or even interesting as the couple of scenes in the movie that made the promotional machine run. While it offers a gag reel and the music video for Amerie's "One Thing," the newest-seeming pieces are five so-so featurettes -- "Dance Steps Made Easy" (elaborating on the scene that solicited so much love during the film's run), "The Dating Experts" (Will Smith and others' advice, such as, "Competence is the thing that is most attractive"), "Love in New York" (director Andy Tennant: "It's such a happening place"), "Will Smith's Red Carpet Race" (see the star interact with screaming fans: "People seem to be excited"), "Hitch Style" (about the "really great wardrobe team).

As this run through suggests, the film is mostly left here to stand on its own, and for what it is -- a romantic comedy starring the adorable and all-genres-conquering Smith -- it is serviceable and a little bit. As Alex "Hitch" Hitchens, he's as charming as he ever was, showing a short range from cocky to vulnerable to slightly vengeful to grateful. Hitch lives in a great New York apartment, earning an apparently pretty penny by teaching sad-sack-sorts how to court the women they desire. And I mean court. Hitch has a moral measure -- his clients must honestly love and worship their targets, and they must earnestly want to make these vaunted objects happy. No one-night-stands or egotists allowed, as is demonstrated when Hitch literally slams the head of one such meanie into his fancy restaurant table for even suggesting that Hitch take his money. "My clients," Hitch instructs, "Actually like women."

Still, Hitch believes his work should be secret, and on top of that he has his own painful romantic history, all of which means that, for all his teaching prowess, he has no love life of his own. This will change during the course of Hitch, of course, even as he's taking on a major instructional project, in the form of corporate accountant Albert (Kevin James). Albert first appears as Hitch scouts him, trying to eat his lunch while smearing mustard all over his pants and spraying his soda in an attempt to clean the pants. In other words, Albert is klutzy and looks hopeless, but Hitch sees in him the requisite sincerity and takes the job. That is, to help Albert win the gorgeous, extremely wealthy, likely un-gettable Allegra (Amber Valletta), a client of Albert's firm.

Hitch goes through the basics with Albert -- he needs to stand out before Allegra, he needs to show her how he's different from other caddish men who are only after her money, he needs to not trip over his own feet while do his flumpy white-man's dance. Albert is fine with all this, though he's quite pleased with the moves he's perfected for his much-practiced dance ("I'm making the pizza," as he swings his arms just so, or "This is the q-tip," as he twists his hand at his head). "Nooo, nooo," Hitch puts his foot down, "Don't you bite your lip!" No more self-expression in quite that fashion. Albert goes along, trying hard during his first date with Allegra not to show too much (though he bursts into dance fits when she looks the other way, unable to contain himself to the strains of Usher's "Yeah.") That he's occasionally undone by his own intense desire -- when Allegra does notice him at the office, he's struck speechless, and lucky that Hitch is hidden behind his door to gesticulate appropriate responses -- only seems to make Albert's love more ingratiating.

The same might not be said for Hitch, who develops his own crush during the proceedings. While Smith qua Smith overcomes any qualms you might have about Hitch (this helped by an obviously designed flashback that shows him as a klutz in college, who loses his first love and literally ends up standing in the rain because he's too sincere and, well, she's a ho), it's still sometimes tiresome to watch his contrived pursuit of New York Standard gossip columnist Sara (Eva Mendes).

That's not to say that Albert's quest is not also contrived -- it's a romantic comedy, after all -- but only that Hitch's combination of expertise and endearing clumsiness makes use of a few too many clichés. And so, the first date is variously bungled (the first problem would appear to be the premise, a trip to Ellis Island and a speech about the legacy and joys of immigrancy, this coming from a black security guard who would do anything for Hitch, because Hitch has helped every man in the city with his romance issues, apparently).

The second is even stranger, as Hitch tries so hard to impress his date -who has brought him on a food rave with her editor Max (Adam Arkin) -- Hitch eats shellfish, to which he has a severe allergy. Here his face swells up so much that Sara must administer emergency Benadryl, over and over again. Now high, Hitch turns confessional, inspiring Sara to reveal her own childhood trauma (a sister nearly killed in an ice-skating accident). To which sad tale Hitch adds his own moral, inscrutable to Sara, but clear enough to you: "One minute you're gliding along, the next minute you're standing in the rain."

The film is structured according to similar incongruities, the two romances intercut so they sort of complement one another, but also compete, undermining Hitch's rhythms. One or the other of the two movies it splices together might have been enough. Then again, as it winds down, taking too long and too many machinations to reach its inevitable happy endings, you see just why the two romances are necessary: without Hitch's own hitch, it would have been just one more instance of the great, good magical Will Smith, not so mystical as Bagger Vance, but still helping the incompetent white guy achieve his end.

Music


Books


Film


Recent
Music

The Top 20 Punk Protest Songs for July 4th

As punk music history verifies, American citizenry are not all shiny, happy people. These 20 songs reflect the other side of patriotism -- free speech brandished by the brave and uncouth.

Books

90 Years on 'Olivia' Remains a Classic of Lesbian Literature

It's good that we have our happy LGBTQ stories today, but it's also important to appreciate and understand the daunting depths of feeling that a love repressed can produce. In Dorothy Strachey's case, it produced the masterful Olivia.

Music

Indie Rocker Alpha Cat Presents 'Live at Vox Pop' (album stream)

A raw live set from Brooklyn in the summer of 2005 found Alpha Cat returning to the stage after personal tumult. Sales benefit organizations seeking to end discrimination toward those seeking help with mental health issues.

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

‘The Avengers’ Offer a Lesson for Our Time of COVID-19

Whereas the heroes in Avengers: Endgame stew for five years, our grief has barely taken us to the after-credit sequence. Someone page Captain Marvel, please.

Music

Between the Grooves of Nirvana's 'Nevermind'

Our writers undertake a track-by-track analysis of the most celebrated album of the 1990s: Nirvana's Nevermind. From the surprise hit that brought grunge to the masses, to the hidden cacophonous noise-fest that may not even be on your copy of the record, it's all here.

Music

Deeper Graves Arrives via 'Open Roads' (album stream)

Chrome Waves, ex-Nachtmystium man Jeff Wilson offers up solo debut, Open Roads, featuring dark and remarkable sounds in tune with Sisters of Mercy and Bauhaus.

Featured: Top of Home Page

The 50 Best Albums of 2020 So Far

Even in the coronavirus-shortened record release schedule of 2020, the year has offered a mountainous feast of sublime music. The 50 best albums of 2020 so far are an eclectic and increasingly "woke" bunch.

Books

First Tragedy, Then Farce, Then What?

Riffing off Marx's riff on Hegel on history, art historian and critic Hal Foster contemplates political culture and cultural politics in the age of Donald Trump in What Comes After Farce?

Reviews

HAIM Create Their Best Album with 'Women in Music Pt. III'

On Women in Music Pt. III, HAIM are done pretending and ready to be themselves. By learning to embrace the power in their weakest points, the group have created their best work to date.

Music

Amnesia Scanner's 'Tearless' Aesthetically Maps the Failing Anthropocene

Amnesia Scanner's Tearless aesthetically maps the failing Anthropocene through its globally connected features and experimental mesh of deconstructed club, reggaeton, and metalcore.

Music

How Lasting Is the Legacy of the Live 8 Charity Concert?

A voyage to the bottom of a T-shirt drawer prompts a look back at a major event in the history of celebrity charity concerts, 2005's Live 8, Philadelphia.

Music

Jessie Ware Embraces Her Club Culture Roots on Rapturous 'What's Your Pleasure?'

British diva Jessie Ware cooks up a glittery collection of hedonistic disco tracks and delivers one of the year's best records with What's Your Pleasure.

Reviews
Collapse Expand Reviews

Features
Collapse Expand Features
PM Picks
Collapse Expand Pm Picks

© 1999-2020 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.