Games

Jack Thompson Finds Rock Bottom

Jack Thompson has finally ticked off enough people to get disbarred. The final step on the way to that disbarment was just kind of sad.

"'I strenuously object?' Is that how it works? Hm? 'Objection.' 'Overruled.' 'Oh, no, no, no. No, I STRENUOUSLY object.' 'Oh. Well, if you strenuously object then I should take some time to reconsider.'"

-Lt. Sam Weinberg (Kevin Pollak) to Lt. Cdr. JoAnne Galloway (Demi Moore) in A Few Good Men

For the last day or so, it's been a little bit difficult to avoid coverage of the disciplinary "hearing" that Jack Thompson took part in last week to determine what sort of punishment he would undergo as a result of his being found guilty of professional misconduct. Of course, I use the scare quotes around the word "hearing" because it wasn't really a hearing at all, in that Thompson had no part in it except to fiddle with the podium, berate the judge, antagonize a couple of members of the press, and stomp off in a huff. As a result, in addition to the case against Mr. Thompson, the prosecutor was also left to offer mitigations, actually helping his case to an extent in, as best as I can tell, the interest of fairness.

They strenuously object.

In the midst of his belittling of Judge Dava Tunis, Thompson even managed to forget the lesson offered by the above exchange in A Few Good Men, telling Judge Tunis that he "[objects] strenuously...to the very notion that this proceeding can even occur on various grounds."

The excellent GamePolitics.com has a transcript of the entire exchange, while the Daily Business Review has the audio. The audio is particularly revelatory, because Thompson sounds just as unreasonable and as belligerent as the common gamer perception of him dictates. Is this how Thompson has always been, or has he simply been blasted by so much legal failure and so much internet hate that he's become the caricature of himself that we've been led to believe is an actual portrait of the man?

I believe that, at least at the start, Thompson had good intentions, that he was truly determined to make a difference. I know that having kids (or a close family connection of any kind, really) can make you want to make the world a better place in the worst way, I know that faith can drive someone as well, and it's hard for me to believe that Jack Thompson was always a self-aggrandizing propagandist with an agenda, unwilling to hear two sides of an argument. He has gone on crusades for the causes of censoring the lyrics of rap music, he has taken on morning talk radio, and he most famously espouses the evils of violent video games. And maybe the man has a point -- while violence in video games can contribute to the visceral thrill of the play experience, some would certainly argue that it occasionally has the propensity to get a bit over the top and gratuitous.

A sudden change of heart, or his next greatest foe?
(Image courtesy of Kotaku)

Still, what once manifested itself as legal maneuvering has turned into a glorified ambulance chase. Thompson has no issue with linking games to major tragedies involving high school and college students, regardless of whether those responsible actually played the games. He comes off as bossy, ruthless, and a blowhard; obviously, something in him snapped somewhere along the way, and he lost the will to make the world a better place, a drive replaced by the undying need to be right.

It is this need that manifested itself in Thompson's tantrum in court, and it is this need that bubbled up so far as to not even allow himself to hear any argument that might discredit his opinion. Now, he's set to be disbarred for the next ten years. For a little perspective, that means he won't be able to practice again until he's 67 years old. It's a sad fate for the man, but perhaps it's what he will need to regain perspective, and some sense of the honor that he left behind long ago. I'd like to believe it's still in him somewhere, that the parasitic brand of self-promotion he has offered can be fixed. Of course, the next time he appears on a news program after a school shooting as an "expert" in the link between gaming violence and real-life violence, well...perhaps my optimism will be tempered.

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