Music

Live From Abbey Road - Episode 7

Live from Abbey Road

Airtime: Thursdays 10 pm
Cast: Matchbox 20, The Script, Def Leppard
Network: Sundance Channel
First date: 2008-07-31
Website
Amazon

Live from Abbey Road show seven (Sundance Channel, Thursday, July 24 at 10 p.m. Eastern and Pacific) has an incredibly diverse line-up this week. Cheers to the show's staff for presenting Modern American mainstream pop next to what's been called the new Celtic soul sound and classic British hard rock to create another eclectic episode.

Matchbox Twenty's Paul Doucette admits at the outset to being "a dork for the Beatles", and imagines he'll have every nook and cranny of Abbey Road's studio one committed to memory before the band finishes its session! The entire band goes into the details behind the creation of the track "How Far We've Come" (off of 2007's Exile on Mainstream) before launching into an incredible live version of it. It's the balance between these bits of trivia and the live performances that Live from Abbey Road really gets right.

In addition to rehearsals and performances of "I Can't Let You Go" and "Bright Lights", Matchbox Twenty pulls out its Lennon and McCartney cover. "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window" is something the band "tacked on" to "Bright Lights" because the two songs shared some elements, but add-on or no, it's a beautiful bit of homage.

The Script is a trio from Dublin that includes former studio musicians, had a single of the week in the UK and toured with last episode darlings the Hoosiers. These interview clips give an interesting, detailed background on the first song too. "We Cry", it is explained, is a song that came from walking down one of the meanest streets in Ireland and wanting to express to its inhabitants the idea that, "a problem shared is a problem halved". The song itself, as well as the performance shown here, is brilliant. The Script's other performance, "Man Who Can't Be Moved" is a gorgeous love song so perfectly realized that if I wasn't watching it, I wouldn't believe it was recorded live.

Joe Eliott starts Def Leppard's segment by explaining how the industry has changed so dramatically since the 1980s. When Def Leppard began, bands had five albums in which to prove their staying power, often not breaking through until the third or fourth. In the '90s, however, the standard procedure became to cut a band if its second release wasn't a million-seller. He theorizes that there'd be no Def Leppard if there hadn't been a third record (which was, by the way, Pyromania!). And that would be a shame, as the band makes quite clear as it fires up "Rocket" from 1987's Hysteria.

The band members give their all on a cover of "Rock On" and it's amazing! Then, they play a new one called "C'mon C'mon", from this year's Songs From the Sparkle Lounge, and it's not only good, it's a prime example of rock and roll in top form. At one point during the interviews, Elliott is saying that they all saw Marc Bolan, David Bowie and Queen growing up, and guitarist Viv Campbell states matter-of-factly "Rock and Roll was a religion back then. It was something that you focused on and it changed your life."

As the world has become increasingly focused on "product" and "the next next big thing" it's lamentable to watch those beliefs dying out. No worries, though. Some say the old ways still yet survive, and with musical diversity like what's shown each week on Live from Abbey Road, I predict a re-awakening!

7
Music


Books


Film


Recent
Reading Pandemics

Pandemic, Hope, Defiance, and Protest in 'Romeo and Juliet'

Shakespeare's well known romantic tale Romeo and Juliet, written during a pandemic, has a surprisingly hopeful message about defiance and protest.

Film

A Family Visit Turns to Guerrilla Warfare in 'The Truth'

Catherine Deneuve plays an imperious but fading actress who can't stop being cruel to the people around her in Hirokazu Koreeda's secrets- and betrayal-packed melodrama, The Truth.

Music

The Top 20 Punk Protest Songs for July 4th

As punk music history verifies, American citizenry are not all shiny, happy people. These 20 songs reflect the other side of patriotism -- free speech brandished by the brave and uncouth.

Books

90 Years on 'Olivia' Remains a Classic of Lesbian Literature

It's good that we have our happy LGBTQ stories today, but it's also important to appreciate and understand the daunting depths of feeling that a love repressed can produce. In Dorothy Strachey's case, it produced the masterful Olivia.

Music

Indie Rocker Alpha Cat Presents 'Live at Vox Pop' (album stream)

A raw live set from Brooklyn in the summer of 2005 found Alpha Cat returning to the stage after personal tumult. Sales benefit organizations seeking to end discrimination toward those seeking help with mental health issues.

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

'Avengers: Endgame' Faces the Other Side of Loss

Whereas the heroes in Avengers: Endgame stew for five years, our pandemic grief has barely taken us to the after-credit sequence. Someone page Captain Marvel, please.

Music

Between the Grooves of Nirvana's 'Nevermind'

Our writers undertake a track-by-track analysis of the most celebrated album of the 1990s: Nirvana's Nevermind. From the surprise hit that brought grunge to the masses, to the hidden cacophonous noise-fest that may not even be on your copy of the record, it's all here.

Music

Deeper Graves Arrives via 'Open Roads' (album stream)

Chrome Waves, ex-Nachtmystium man Jeff Wilson offers up solo debut, Open Roads, featuring dark and remarkable sounds in tune with Sisters of Mercy and Bauhaus.

Featured: Top of Home Page

The 50 Best Albums of 2020 So Far

Even in the coronavirus-shortened record release schedule of 2020, the year has offered a mountainous feast of sublime music. The 50 best albums of 2020 so far are an eclectic and increasingly "woke" bunch.

Books

First Tragedy, Then Farce, Then What?

Riffing off Marx's riff on Hegel on history, art historian and critic Hal Foster contemplates political culture and cultural politics in the age of Donald Trump in What Comes After Farce?

Reviews

HAIM Create Their Best Album with 'Women in Music Pt. III'

On Women in Music Pt. III, HAIM are done pretending and ready to be themselves. By learning to embrace the power in their weakest points, the group have created their best work to date.

Music

Amnesia Scanner's 'Tearless' Aesthetically Maps the Failing Anthropocene

Amnesia Scanner's Tearless aesthetically maps the failing Anthropocene through its globally connected features and experimental mesh of deconstructed club, reggaeton, and metalcore.

Reviews
Collapse Expand Reviews

Features
Collapse Expand Features
PM Picks
Collapse Expand Pm Picks

© 1999-2020 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.