Music

Lo Carmen - "Sometimes It's Hard" (video) (premiere)

Photo: Katerina Stratos

The Australian Americana songwriter joins forces with Bonnie 'Prince' Billy for an atmospheric tune based in equal parts light and dark.

One could say that Lo Carmen was born with music in her blood. Her dad is progressive rocker Peter Head, after all, and she's been following in his musical footsteps since at least 10-years-old when she wrote her first tune.


She's come a long way since, recording five solo records as well as collaborating with her father for the past decade and a half. Since then, she's made a name for herself past her starring roles in hits like Red Dog and Blue Murder, becoming an internationally respected name in Americana music.

Preceding her new album, Lovers Dreamers Fighters, out on 10 November, Carmen is releasing a music video for her new single, "Sometimes It's Hard". She joins forces on the track with Bonnie 'Prince' Billy and the two develop an atmospheric, swampy duet beside the production magic of David "Ferg" Ferguson (Johnny Cash, Sturgill Simpson).

In the video, Lo finds herself entangled in an awkward game of tennis with a competitor, played by Coati Mundi. All's well that ends well, though, and perhaps in a most unexpected fashion.

Carmen says, "Life and love are full of ebbs and flows, ups and downs, and sometimes the downs feel like they're never coming up for air. I feel like a reminder that a shift in the wind can change everything is always welcome in the collective headphones of the world, a little candle in the window perhaps.

"Songs are generally dramatic in nature, and I liked the idea of simply recognizing the value of perspective in the world of love and taking comfort in the fact that life encompasses dark and light equally, and its worth just hanging in there. No-one embodies all the shades of love better than Bonnie 'Prince' Billy, which makes me so glad and grateful he sang it with me."

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