Music

Palm - "Dog Milk" (Singles Going Steady)

Photo: Dylan Pearce

Here we are, in 2018, and we finally have a band that sounds like the lo-fi budget version of looping math-rockers Battles.

Evan Sawdey: Here we are, in 2018, and we finally have a band that sounds like the lo-fi budget version of looping math-rockers Battles. This is noisy and clangy and filled with purpose: they're working a robotic groove using fuzzed-out instruments, and it's challenging as it is refreshing. It's not that we'll take it in the absence of a new Battles record -- it's that we're eagerly waiting to see the identity that Palm makes for itself. [8/10]

Tristan Kneschke: General tips for shooting a successful music video:

  • Energy is infectious. A sleepwalking band doesn't do anyone favors. A couple of energy drinks can go a long way.
  • Don't just lock the camera and statically shoot each band member. If it's boring to shoot, it sure as hell will be boring to watch.
  • Random zoo footage of animals doesn't give a video meaning.
  • Repeated clips certainly don't either.
  • Think about the video's theme and choose shots stylistically. The extraneous shots of mountains, helicopters, and marathoners could have easily been excised from this video.
  • Include more shots of bad digitization like at the end of the video. People love to see stuff get fucked up. [2/10]

Steve Horowitz: There is a pleasantly uncompromising quality about the way in which the different elements bang and clash with each other to create something so right. They all seem to be playing a different song at the same time to create a vertical medley rather than the usual horizontal efforts. The twists and turns elevate one's consciousness. The thought of dog milk may be unappetizing, and I have no idea what the song is about, but Palm makes me hungry for more. [8/10]

Robert Evers: Hard to pin down exactly. A creative clash of instrumentation, building towards a delightful indie pop sweet spot. Interesting video, reminds me of a high school video production class, on purpose. [9/10]

Adriane Pontecorvo: There are a couple of moments in any Palm song where you wonder if you left some audio running in another tab or if your computer is about to crash. Fear not: it's all in the name of art. The steelpan alleviates some of the sonic weight, but sometimes it still feels like a little too much repetition. [5/10]

Ljubinko Zivkovic: A very intriguing song that sounds like a good variation on what could be called a standard "shoegaze thing". Traces of My Bloody Valentine-style vocals and Stereolab rhythm patterns, where keyboards have replaced the guitar sounds. The images themselves look like they have been haphazardly arranged by an amateur, as a stream of consciousness array, only to turn into very good band video portraits towards the end. Promising. [8/10]

John Garratt: When I heard the steel drum at the 0:12 mark, I thought "wow, that's a little annoying". Little did I know I'd have to put up with it for another five minutes. Cutsey indie has bottomed out. This is terrible. [1/10]

SCORE: 5.86

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