Books

Re:Print welcomes 2008

Welcome back to Re:Print.

It's been a big week, yeah? I've spent much of it stifling at work, in an un-air-conditioned DVD shop, hating every single face that says to me: "Wow, it's hot in here!" Really? We hadn't noticed. And neither had the last 35 customers to sweat their way through the latest releases. Global warming is well and truly under way, and has landed smack on Australia. Here I am, 11.09pm on New Year's Day and the air blowing through my office window is filthy and hot. It stinks of dirty grass. No relief, not even at home, not even at midnight. Actually, the split-system in the living room is brilliant, but my partner refuses to let me move the computer next to the TV. So, here I am, and it's hot.

New Year's was a slow one. I spent it watching Wild Palms, of all things. Scouring the 'net today, though, I see a good time was had by most elsewhere in the universe. We heard fireworks going off, which excited me, until a little boy came into the shop this morning with a "Missing Dog" poster -- the terrier named Bonnie ran away in fear of those fireworks, apparently. So, there's that tradition ruined. Here's hoping Bonnie finds her way home safely. My pup, Fulci, feels her pain. He spent the noisy clock-turning under a blanket by the couch.

As always, my New Year's resolution is to "read more". I say it every year, and usually wind up reading roughly the same amount of books as the year before. With a new house, and a new library all set up and looking awesome in the other room, I've decided that even if I read the same amount of books as last year, I want some of them to be those steadily yellowing over there, that I already own. I'm toning down the book-buying, and digging through the existing stockpiles for new and exciting reads. I'll let you know how I go as the months progress. At the moment, I'm still knee-deep in movie tie-ins, with The Assassination of Jesse James... on the go now, and Death Sentence coming up next. I just finished Reservation Road by John Burnham Schwartz -- a quick read, horribly morbid and sad. Jesse James is proving a harder task -- Ron Hansen's language is true to the time period, and I'm wrapping my tongue around old west words more sluggishly than expected. After the movie books, it’s classics all the way. Well, long-standing shelf-dwellers, at any rate.

Here’s to a great 2008 in books. Myself and my co-blogger, Lara Killian, will be here to capture the highs and lows as we see them. For now, here are some articles to read to get you ready for Books '08:

Read all about the best books of 2007 set in New Jersey.

Who will be who in 2008 according to the Guardian.

Compare Ty Burr’s reading resolutions to your own, like this one:

Read at least one book that is not being adapted into a major motion picture. In 2007 I really enjoyed reading The Golden Compass and Atonement and No Country for Old Men and Persepolis and The Kite Runner (OK, the last one not so much). Was there anything else that came out last year? Can someone tell my wife I'll get around to The Omnivore's Dilemma when Cate Blanchett is signed to star in it?

Hmm, yes.

'Psycho': The Mother of All Horrors

Psycho stands out not only for being one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films, it is also one of his most influential. It has been a template and source material for an almost endless succession of later horror films, making it appropriate to identify it as the mother of all horror films.

Francesc Quilis
Film

The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles Graffiti (By the Book)

With discussions of characters like Leon Ray Livingston (a.k.a. "A-No. 1"), credited with consolidating the entire system of hobo communication in the 1910s, and Kathy Zuckerman, better known as the surf icon "Gidget", Susan A. Phillips' lavishly illustrated The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles Graffiti, excerpted here from Yale University Press, tells stories of small moments that collectively build into broad statements about power, memory, landscape, and history itself.

Susan A. Phillips
Books

The 10 Best Indie Pop Albums of 2009

Indie pop in 2009 was about all young energy and autumnal melancholy, about the rush you feel when you first hear an exciting new band, and the bittersweet feeling you get when your favorite band calls it quits.

Music
Pop Ten
Mixed Media
PM Picks

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