Books

Salman Rushdie knighted

"If you're lucky enough to have even one book gets into people's consciousness in that way then its fortunate, and the fact that that book (Midnight's Children ... 27 years after it was published is still interesting to people, I'm very proud of that."

Salman Rushdie discusses his knighthood on a short, taped interview with the BBC News.

The AFP has a piece on the event here, and India's Sify news has a brief piece on its site.

Meanwhile, Rushdie's new book, The Enchantress of Florence, was reviewed by the Philadelphia Inquirer during the week. Reviewer Carlin Romano had this to say:

In some ways, "Enchantress" launches a successor style to now-passe magic realism -- call it sardonic exoticism. On top of Rushdie's customary wryness (one perk in Akbar's water-park capital is "the best of all possible pools"), Rushdie takes Rabelasian risks here that will please all serious readers: those who expect sentences, and not just plots, to surprise them.

Over the Rainbow: An Interview With Herb Alpert

Music legend Herb Alpert discusses his new album, Over the Rainbow, maintaining his artistic drive, and his place in music history. "If we tried to start A&M in today's environment, we'd have no chance. I don't know if I'd get a start as a trumpet player. But I keep doing this because I'm having fun."

Jedd Beaudoin
Music

The Cigarette: A Political History (By the Book)

Sarah Milov's The Cigarette restores politics to its rightful place in the tale of tobacco's rise and fall, illustrating America's continuing battles over corporate influence, individual responsibility, collective choice, and the scope of governmental power. Enjoy this excerpt from Chapter 5. "Inventing the Nonsmoker".

Sarah Milov
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