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CONTEST: Spotify Creates Exciting Interactive Site Highlighting the Year in Music

Major Lazer

Spotify has created Year in Music showing the highlights of the year in music and they offer up an exclusive contest for PopMatters readers.

#SPONSOR: Our favorite music streaming service, Spotify, has created Year in Music showing the highlights of the year in music and it looks like Major Lazer is the major winner of most streamed song on Spotify, "Lean On", receiving heavy play throughout the entire year.

Top Artist honors go to Drake, who was the most listened to artist of the year. The Weeknd takes the crown for most popular album with his forward-looking, star-making Beauty Behind the Madness.

Ed Sheeran, Mark Ronson and Hozier dominated last Winter while Wiz Khalifa, Ellie Goulding and Major Lazer brought it in the Spring. By summer, Major Lazer and Wiz Khalifa were still in heavy rotation with the addition of OMI. Fall was R&B and hip-hop time as Drake and the Weeknd were the most popular artists along with Justin Bieber.

Pop, hip-hop and rock were the most listened to genres among Spotify users worldwide, highlighting how hip-hop is very quickly becoming a dominant force in popular music. In the year of Kendrick Lamar and far too many controversial events like Ferguson, hip-hop clearly speaks to music fans across the spectrum and was arguably the most relevant music of the year.

Since hip-hop has been covered so thoroughly on Spotify's Year in Music site, we'd have to say that 2015 may prove to be the year that the mainstream country music scene finally shifted back towards more authentic, roots-bound country. Last year Sturgill Simpson and Ashley Monroe were emblematic of that move, but 2015 was the year it really took with Chris Stapleton coming out of bluegrass' SteelDrivers and onto the CMA stage as male vocalist, best new artist and album of the year. His duet with Justin Timberlake on the CMA awards shot his star even higher as his stellar Traveller album his #1 on the charts right after the show.

Spotify has also created a number of catchy and compelling playlists surrounding some of the year's major events musical and otherwise. We saw the long-awaited return of Missy Elliott, who schooled the young 'uns on how it's done. Marriage equality was finally achieved in the United States in a landmark Supreme Court decision. NASA announced major news like the discovery of water on Mars in the year that Star Wars returns to the big screen.

As if that wasn't enough, the truly best part of this Year in Music site is how it summarizes your Year in Music.You may be surprised by the results.

CONTEST

Check out Spotify’s ‘Year in Music’ and post your personal ‘Year in Music’ share card in the comments section to enter for the “Year in Music” giveaway. The giveaway (one first prize winner, US only, 18+) will include:

o One (1) year Premium subscription to Spotify

o One (1) pair of Bose SoundSport in-ear headphones

o One (1) Soundwave Canvas

o One (1) $50 TicketMaster gift card

This post was made possible through my partnership with Spotify. The prize was provided by Spotify, but Spotify and its agents and representatives are not a sponsor, administrator, or involved in any other way with this giveaway. All opinions expressed in the post are my own and not those of Spotify or its agents and representatives.”

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