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Stephen Tow's 'London, Reign Over Me' Is a Must-Read Tour of '60s British Rock

Historian Stephen Tow's London, Reign Over Me is an insightful, thorough, and welcoming exploration of '60s-era British rock.

Jordan Blum
Recent
Music

The Rolling Stones: Their Satanic Majesties Request (50th Anniversary)

Despite (or perhaps because of) the outside pressures the Rolling Stones faced in recording Satanic Majesties, it stands 50 years later as arguably the most experimental, tongue-in-cheek, and underappreciated album of their long history.

Reviews

Richard Goldstein on the Front Lines With Janis Joplin, Andy Warhol, Abby Hoffman and More

Richard Goldstein's journey is a closely observed, fervently lived “I was there” account of the music, the politics, the sex, the drugs, and the poetry in rock lyrics.

Reviews

'Subversives' Tells How Academic Freedom Came Under Fire and Was Changed Forever

The political drama that unfolds in these pages is a tragedy of the greatest kind: men who champion American ideals such as freedom of expression are squashed by men of power.

Books

Guston's Ghosts: 'Out of Time: Philip Guston and the Refiguration of American Postwar Art'

Robert Slifkin's book on Philip Guston is an incantatory debut work that shows us a compelling new side of the artist's famous Marlborough paintings.

Politics

Comics-in-Chief: Laughing With (and At) the Presidents -- The Scathing Slice of the Satirical Edge

When America chose Nixon over Paulsen at the polls, it ushered in a president that many consider one of the most humor-challenged in modern history.

Music

McGough & McGear: McGough & McGear

This 1968 album of psychedelic rock and folksy poetry became a collector's item due to its rarity and long list of celebrity contributors. What happens when you strip away that mystique with a reissue?

Film

'Lord of the Flies' Still Reigns

Fear and brutality inherent in the human condition and the drive to survive are themes that have never gone out of fashion. The stakes get even higher when those involved are children, and that's obviously a big seller.

Music

La Barra de Chocolate: La Barra de Chocolate

Less satisfactory than it was in 1969, when the band was winning talent contests and the second single was selling 40,000 copies.

Deanne Sole
Music

Lee Fields & The Expressions: Faithful Man

Soul Man Lee Fields continues to show his allegiance to classic R&B.

Reviews

Mod Film Noir: 'Brighton Rock'

Rowan Joffe sets this adaptation in 1964, amidst the mods and the rockers. A mods-versus-rockers riot serves as chaotic cover for one of the film’s acts of murder.

Reviews

'United Red Army': Revolutionaries Lost Without a Map

This ambitious three-hour-plus examination of Japan's notorious radical left-wing militant group loses its way in the narrative fog.

Books

'On the Ground's Tale of the Underground Press Relies on 'Anecdote' and 'Atmosphere'

Fascinating to look at and bursting with stories from those who led the charge, On the Ground proves long on anecdotes short on historical impact.

Film

'Norwegian Wood' Is Pretty Onscreen, But Puzzling

Haruki Murakami's Norwegian Wood has been referred to as the "Japanese Catcher in the Rye", but J. D. Salinger said that his book was not actable and he would never sell the rights to Hollywood. Maybe Murakami should have listened to Salinger.

Music

Los Saicos: Demolición: The Complete Recordings

Occasionally compared to their North American contemporaries the Trashmen, Los Saicos sound more feral.

Reviews

'Stuck Rubber Baby' Brilliantly Illustrates the Complex Era of 'Kennedytime' in American History

In this new edition of this excellent work of graphic fiction, Howard Cruse never suggests the battles against racism and homophobia were won -- or even that they ever could be.

Music

Various Artists: Dengue Fever Presents Electric Cambodia

It's the particular pitch of a female singer like Ros Sereysothea that makes this music singular.

Reviews

Rolling Stones: In the 1960s

This two-disc set is a decent attempt at encapsulating the group's early career -- a formidable task given the complexities of both the band and the era.

Reviews

Taking Woodstock

The Ang Lee take on Woodstock never gets much beyond these clichés: hippies took drugs, rain made mud, the music was great and crowds were huge.

Books

Please Step Back by Ben Greenman

It’s maddening to see addiction for the way it turns a person into the one-dimensional cliché familiar from a hundred After School Specials and Behind the Musics.

Books

Dusty! Queen of the Postmods by Annie J. Randall

As Randall thoroughly explores, Dusty Springfield's physical transfiguration and visual impact were only the tip of her transformation.

Books

The Bad Girl by Mario Vargas Llosa

The Bad Girl works better as a travelogue of Ricardo, the rootless intellect, than as a fabulist's tale of love gone sour right from the start.

Chris Barsanti
Music

Flower Power: Stepping Back From the Past

After years of talking about how great this music is, it's time we started actually listening to it. For example, does a song sound like the year 1968, or does it sound like Deep Purple?

Books

Their Dogs Came With Them by Helena Maria Viramontes

Viramontes loves L.A., and her new novel is a multilayered homage to the lives of "the forgotten poor... the despised and reviled" in East L.A./Boyle Heights of the 1960s.

Kate Soto
Music

The Doors: Open for Business (Again)

If the first two Doors albums are drugs, they’d be of the decidedly psychedelic variety; the next couple are a dangerous cocktail of amphetamines and Quaaludes. Morrison Hotel is beer: authentic, unfiltered, as American as it gets. L.A. Woman manages to be all of the above.

Sean Murphy
Music

The Zombies: Live at the Bloomsbury Theatre, London

Forty years after their groundbreaking, wonderful, alternatively-spelled Odessey and Oracle, Colin Blunstone and Rod Argent form a cheesy Zombies cover band.

Books

The Beatles and Philosophy by Michael Baur and Steven Baur [Editors]

Perhaps Lennon's pop-song gibberish happens to have a fluke connection with Hindu philosophy, but it seems irresponsible to make intentional bedfellows of the two.

Music

The Zombies: Odessey & Oracle

Odessey & Oracle is the weekly record, a compiling of sentiment that's comfortable enough for anytime, be it free weekend space or during mundane cubicle labor.

Dominic Umile

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