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Illusion Is Power: The Indiscernible Nature of Influence in 'Stavisky...'

Resnais's approach to direction is similar to Montaigne's approach to the essay: sticking to concrete fact and recognizable example, the viewer/reader is transported with unexpected celerity to the far reaches of abstraction.

Recent
Culture

Blast Shadows

The atomic bombing of Hiroshima forever altered popular culture, and the earliest traces of that tectonic shift can be found in an obscure government report and newsreel about the event.

Reviews

You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet : 2 October 2012 - New York City

In You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet at the New York Film Festival, the 90-year-old French film maker Alain Resnais asks "Will I leave behind something of significance and relevance when I die?"

Film

Cannes 2012: Day 6 - 'You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet' + 'Barbara'

Day six brings perhaps the final film from French legend Alain Resnais, whose You Ain’t See Nothin’ Yet has a shot at the big prize. Meanwhile New German Cinema movement director Christian Petzold returns with Barbara.

Film

Cannes 2012: Day 2 - 'Rust & Bone' + 'Mekong Hotel' + 'Paradise: Love'

Cannes coverage continues with reviews of Jacques Audiard hotly tipped Rust & Bone, a short film from Thailand’s sensational Apichatpong Weerasethakul, and the latest from severe Austrian auteur Ulrich Seidel.

Film

The 100 Essential Directors Part 8: Jean Renoir to Douglas Sirk

From Jean Renior through Douglas Sirk, there may be some choices that raise an eyebrow. While each of the directors we look at today might not be on every cinephile's list of great directors, they absolutely merit inclusion for their distinct visions and dedication to their craft, some despite their questionable personal lives and politics.

Reviews

Last Year at Marienbad

This is the cinematic equivalent of whale bone-enforced corset, silk from the colonies, and the kind of workmanship only extreme class disparity can provide.

Marijeta Bozovic
Film

Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard) (1955)

It is darkly ambivalent about the veracity of our memories (both individually and collectively).

Chris Elliot
Reviews

Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959)

In Hiroshima Mon Amour, Resnais and his screenwriter, French novelist Marguerite Duras, show their debts to the Modernists.

Michael S. Smith
Reviews
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