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The Princess Bride: Blu-Ray

Reiner and Goldman manage to marry timeless storytelling elements with modern comedic sensibilities in such a way that it will never feel corny, old-fashioned, or dated.

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The Free Will

When it comes to depicting angst-ridden anti-heros like Theo, this film takes an approach most don't have the courage to try.

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Semi-Pro

It wouldn't hurt to keep Ferrell out of the locker room for a few years or more.

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Youth Without Youth

"You learn more quickly, more profoundly in dreams" -- the audience becomes a part of the hallucinations.

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White Mane

The blending of the natural with the fantastical is truly remarkable and elevates this film from simple child’s play to high art.

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Semi-Pro

For viewers who are already tired of the Will Ferrell sports spoof, the new installment is more of the same. For those who love the films, it is also... more of the same.

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Kaspar Hauser

An intriguing drama that creates a complex world of scandal so atmospheric that you hardly realize how truly discomfiting and bizarre the imagery is until you've emerged from it.

Matthew A. Stern
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Youth Without Youth

Based on the writings of Mircea Eliade, Francis Ford Coppola's first movie in 10 years is goofy, contrived, and self-absorbed.

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La Jetee / Sans Soleil (1962)

The persistence and permutation of memory (or the truth about cats, blondes, Hitchcock, video games, and the post-apocalypse) -- what more would you expect from Chris Marker's entry into the Criterion Collection?

Film

Part 2: The Changing Face of Filmmaking

Every staid situation needs shaking up, none more so that the labored Hollywood studio system. The titles chosen for this section stand out as reasons why things had to change, the results of those seismic stylistic shifts.

Film

Part 1: Pure Classicism

In its infancy, the cinematic artform went through some formidable technological and stylistic changes. The ten DVDs discussed here highlight the very definition of the Golden Age of filmmaking.

Featured: Top of Home Page

Kids' DVDs: June 2007

Given that babies and young children love nothing more than repetition, repetition, and... um.... repetition, I can't understand why even the pointiest of heads would think children between the ages of six months and three years could possible need 23 different Baby Einstein DVDs.

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La Vie Promise (2002)

Despite Huppert’s commendable performance this film sinks under the weight of derivative characters, contrived and overly convenient plot points, and simplistic themes.

Kate Williams
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Charlottes Web (2006)

Surprise! There is nothing even remotely offensive or ironic or postmodern about Charlotte's Web.

Daynah Burnett
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They Filmed the War in Color: The Pacific War (2005)

This films lifts the veil from the gray representation of the past that we've come to expect, and the colors bursting off the screen make the familiar both strange and wonderful.

Brian Holcomb
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A Heart in Winter (1993)

Neglected for too long by North American audiences, Un Coeur en Hiver is a subtle, intelligent, and provocative piece of cinema that should not be overlooked.

Kate Williams
Film

Idlewild (2006)

Percy's a mortician, aware of the ways that bodies can be disfigured and rearranged, how life and death are performances for audiences.

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Thief

You're still catching your breath after Lem's devastating exit last week on The Shield. And now comes a whole other kind of hurt. André Braugher plays a career criminal whose life swings way out of control in Thief, FX's slot-replacement for Lem's show.

Cynthia Fuchs
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À Double Tour (1959)

À Double Tour is a visually engrossing if emotionally underwhelming thriller set in one the director's prototypically dysfunctional families.

David Sanjek
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Four Brothers (2005)

'I grew up in sunny southern California, and I'm not used to snow,' says John Singleton. 'I wanted to do a movie with snow in it, so here it is.'"

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Four Brothers (2005)

In between the guilt-tripping and the domestic melodrama, the boys argue over priorities.

Cynthia Fuchs
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Le Cercle Rouge (1970)

It was one of Melville's most commercially successful features, which comes as little surprise considering the pedigree of its stars.

David Sanjek
Film

The Dark Side of the Heart (El Lado Oscuro del Corazón) (1992)

Here Death is Oliverio's sparring partner, a sardonic harridan who trades barbs with him like an existentialist Alice Kramden.

John G. Nettles
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