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New Translation of Balzac's 'Lost Illusions' Captivates

More than just a tale of one man's fall, Balzac's Lost Illusions charts how literature becomes another commodity in a system that demands backroom deals, moral compromise, and connections.

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Memoir 'Scratched' Seeks Beauty in the Flawed

Scratched: A Memoir of Perfectionism is a staggering depiction of the impact of psychological trauma written with breathless intensity.

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You Become the Watcher in Eric Haven's 'Cryptoid'

In his latest work, Cryptoid, Eric Haven takes an idiosyncratically weird approach to the horror genre of the Weird to produce a hybrid graphic novella that belongs to no genre but his own.

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'Egress' Mourns and Celebrates the Life and Work of Theorist Mark Fisher

Mark Fisher's insights are often obscured in Matt Colquhoun's personal/academic hybrid, Egress, which ranges far and wide over philosophy and pop culture.

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Blues Everywhere She Goes: Odetta

Ian Zack's biography gives the often-overlooked Odetta a chance to keeping shining that little light of hers.

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The Two Worlds of Graphic Novel Umma's Table

Where fiction typically emphasizes plot, Yeon-Sik Hong's Umma's Table emphasizes a rich layering of events that creates the artful impression of memoir-like fiction.

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Joan Didion's Crystal-Clear Vision Only Got Better with Age

Reading the Library of America's comprehensive anthology, Joan Didion: The 1960s & 70s, is like walking out of the rain and into a time warp.

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Television and Women's History through the Lens of Soap Operas

Media critic Elana Levine's Her Stories explores television history and the conflicts of generation, gender, and race in the heyday of "women's" soap operas.

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Racism's Trauma Reverberates Across Generations in 'Your House Will Pay'

Steph Cha's depiction of systematic racism in Your House Will Pay is compelling, attesting to the complicated social structures at play.

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Ted Templeman Biography Casts a Wide, Deep Net

Producer Ted Templeman and biographer Greg Renoff successfully capture a wide-ranging career in Ted Templeman: A Platinum Producer's Life in Music.

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Are You, Too, a Walking Manifesto?

We are living in a season of manifestos and Breanne Fahs is our queen. Our guidebook: Burn It Down!: Feminist Manifestos for the Revolution.

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On the Socially Conscious Filmmaker, Sidney Lumet

Maura Spiegel's biography provides a thorough and compelling look at the life and films of the progressive New York icon filmmaker, Sidney Lumet.

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Striking for Its Art, 'New World' Is a Magic Parable of Resistance, Guilt, ​and Forgiveness

David Jesus Vignolli's graphic novel, New World, chronicles Indigenous resistance to European monsters in gorgeous art and mythic undertones.

Books

Black. Queer. Southern. Women.

Conveyed with urgency and mindfulness, Johnson's Black. Queer. Southern. Women. creates a space for revisioning critical race and sexual ideologies while affirming the voices of queer black women.

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Reflections and Refractions: 'Apple, Tree: Writers on Their Parents'

The contributors to Apple, Tree: Writers on Their Parents identify nuance; frequently framing themselves and their parents through multiple lenses.

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'Night Theater': Surgery, Corruption, and Chekhov

The well-timed choreography of Vikram Paralkar's Night Theater leads us to interrogate the unfamiliar notes of our personal harmonies.

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The New Empire Has Risen: 'New Kings of the World'

Author Fatima Bhutto profiles the new arbiters of mass culture: Bollywood, Dizi, and K-pop, in her engaging cultural studies/travelogue, New Kings of the World.

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'Adults and Other Children': The Bitter and the Sweet

The similes in Miriam Cohen's impressive debut short story collection, Adults and Other Children, are perfectly attuned to the essence of her characters.

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Rebecca Solnit Attains Peace of Mind

The fact that Rebecca Solnit still exists is all the proof we need that her feminist thinking remains vital.

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Who Can I Be Now? Picking Through Mat Osman's 'The Ruins'

Mat Osman's mystery, The Ruins, turns excess into artistry.

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In 'Afterimages' Laura Mulvey Returns to Feminist Film Criticism with Fresh Insights

Mulvey's Afterimages draws together her recent writing on women and film to create an engaging collection that is both timely and time-centred.

Books

The Soul of the Machine in William Gibson's 'Agency'

In William Gibson's prequel to The Peripheral, Agency, Hillary Clinton is president, but that's only a detail.

Books

Short Story Author Larry Brown's Big Love for His Small Characters

Although his works evoke Charles Bukowski, Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers, and William Faulkner, Larry Brown's unapologetic characters were always his own.

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Rikke Villadsen's 'Cowboy' Is Warped

Rikke Villadsen's graphic fiction, Cowboy, is an aggressively peculiar take on an already aggressively peculiar genre.

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John Hodgman Is Flying High in Memoir, 'Medallion Status'

TV star/writer/podcast host -- just don't call him a standup comic -- John Hodgman tackles class aspiration and other inconveniences in his memoir, Medallion Status.

Books

Why Do We Travel? On Erika Fatland's 'Sovietistan'

Social anthropologist Erika Fatland eschews many of the clichés of Post-Soviet travel writing, providing an incident-packed trip to a vast, often-overlooked region in Sovietistan.

Books

'Uncanny Valley': When the Confidence Boys Took Over Everything

Anna Wiener's Silicon Valley memoir, Uncanny Valley, reveals a piratical industry choking on its own hubris and blind to the cost of its destruction.

Books

Ian McEwan's Brexit Satire, 'The Cockroach', Leaves Little to the Imagination

With his latest, The Cockroach, the otherwise masterful British novelist Ian McEwan proves that too much cleverness can kill satire.

Books

Chuck Palahniuk's Memoir, 'Consider This', Is As Unsafe As His Fiction

Chuck Palahniuk has lived some amazing stories while he has written his much-consumed stories. As we're lead to believe, anyway.

Books

Dave Eggers' 'The Captain and the Glory' Barely Stays Afloat

Dave Eggers' latest is a slim satire about the sinking ship of Donald Trump and the potential sinking of the glorious ship of State.

Books

'The Opposite of Fate' Embraces Life, However Inopportune

In The Opposite of Fate, Alison McGhee humanizes the abortion issue in a way that is unexpected and heartening.

Books

What's to Be Believed in Yoshiharu Tsuge's 'The Man Without Talent'?

Tsuge's narrator's mustache is no more convincing a disguise than Superman's Clark Kent glasses—which is the paradoxical point in The Man Without Talent.

Books

The Rolling Stones Go to College

The Cambridge Companion to the Rolling Stones, the first book of academic essays about the band, considers not only what the band accomplished, but why, 60 years since they formed, the Rolling Stones still matter.

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Encountering 'Futures': A Science Fiction Series

Let each story from Radix Media's Futures: A Science Fiction Series Box Set make its world an enduring part of your own.

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'Mister Rogers and Philosophy', for the Children Now Grown

Mister Rogers and Philosophy considers reality, fantasy, and our philosophical role in both worlds of the long-running PBS children's program, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood.

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They Will Drown in Their Mothers' Tears

In They Will Drown in Their Mothers' Tears, Johannes Anyuru puts readers in a state of mind similar to that of his confused characters while offering an engaging challenge.

Books

The Burning Resilience of the Human Mind: 'Angry Queer Somali Boy'

Mohamed Abdulkarim Ali's raw and visceral memoir, Angry Queer Somali Boy, brilliantly reveals the impact of racism and colonialism on immigrant lives.

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