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Film

Down with Pleasure: The Lost Films of Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin

Arrow Films and Kino-Lorber offer hard-to-find works of Godard and Gorin.

Recent
Film

How About Some Noah Baumbach, Paul Thomas Anderson, Robert Altman & Akira Kurosawa for the Holidays?

If you ever wonder why certain elements get tossed into a movie, remember: beauty never needs to be justified. These and other thoughts on recent Blu-ray releases.

Television

Mourning in America: Remembering 'Twin Peaks'

Frustrating expectations was part of Twin Peaks modus operandi.

Internet

Domestic Infelicity: 'Way Out' Is Lost and Found on YouTube

Roald Dahl's short-lived anthology feels like a merging of Rod Serling's horror and sci-fi with Alfred Hitchcock's obsession with unhappy marriages.

Film

Separate But Unequal: 'Pioneers of African-American Cinema'

Funded by Kickstarter, this five-disc set preserves and restores the most significant collection of "race films" on DVD and Blu-ray.

Film

UCLA Film & Television Archive to the Rescue

The Chase, Too Late for Tears, Woman on the Run and The Southerner are all examples of postwar indie cinema that had fallen through the cracks -- until now.

Film

The Bad and the Beautiful: B-Horrors Go Blu

Surrounded by faceless men, stone men, and brainless men, the mesmerizing "Queen of Blood" belongs in her own class.

Film

40 Nights at the Movies (in the Comfort of Your Home): The Franchise

Back by popular demand! Recommendations from "40 Nights at the Movies" will keep you, your dog and your elephant glued to the couch for months.

Film

The Life, Death and Afterlife of Video Stores

In the dust of long gone video stores ghosts of film geeks past forever roam.

Film

On Denaturing Racial Elements in Two '50s-era Films

Two fascinating bits of Americana, Black Gold and Face of Fire, are defined by racial themes, yet tackle the subject quite differently.

Film

Calling Mr. Aldrich: The '50s-era Fisticuffs of 'World for Ransom' and 'Ten Seconds to Hell'

Robert Aldrich favors the classical presentation of angry cynical characters given to violence and grotesquery, which means he's often "tasteless" and discomfitting.

Film

Farther Than You Think: Mapping the Noir Terrain

Rope of Sand, Dark City, and Union Station each extend the shadowy reach of film noir.

Film

Ambiguously Yours: The Late Works of the Late Otto Preminger

Hurry Sundown, Skidoo, and Such Good Friends welcome you to a world of crowded frames and uncertain tones.

Television

The Adventures of Two Boys and an Elephant

At its best, Maya serves as a window into an era of kids' adventure series with unusually authentic production values and undercurrents of thoughtful attention to cultural differences.

Film

Films for Fans of Visionary Directors

In film, "visionary" has become a marketing adjective, like "iconic". Here, on the matter of visionary directors, we separate the claret from the beaujolais, if you will.

Film

From Love to Decline: Giving Evelyn Waugh a Sixties Spin

The Loved One gives viewers that "sick kick", and Decline and Fall of a Bird Watcher perfectly captures Waugh's tone of cruel, facetious, and lunatic whimsies.

Television

Watching 'Search' Is Like Carrying the Internet Around in Your Head

When you pay for Probe's services, you're not only getting the agent of the week but also a passel of experts with their tiny cameras, microphones, and zirconium-shelled "audio implants".

Film

60 Nights at the Movies: The Sequel

The success of Canon Fodder's "50 Nights at the Movies -- at Home!" Requires a bigger and better sequel. Or at least, a longer one. Might want to make some popcorn before sitting down for this one.

Books

Around the World in 40 Books: From the Dog's POV to the Novel-as-Peyote

My ramblings about reading are so valued that I'm now a big star in Tanzania. On my recent whirlwind tour I was mobbed at the airport and carried about on people's shoulders.

Film

50 Nights at the Movies -- at Home!

Who needs Netflix and its fees? Make a list of movies and take it to the nearest public library.

Film

How Do Film Adaptations of Books, Such As 'The Great Gatsby', Affect an Author's Literary Status?

Many people assert axiomatically that "the book is always better", while others have suggested that bad books make good movies and good books make bad movies. But do films adapted from books, good or bad, give books a longer shelf-life?

Film

Do Women Have Sex? 'The Chapman Report'

Everyone knows it's impossible for any woman to enjoy guilt-free sex with jazz musicians and delivery boys.

Television

If He Had a Hammer: Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer

TV's Mike Hammer could never be as violent and cynical as in the books; it wouldn't be allowed by censors.

Film

A Light-Hearted Romp through John Hustonian Darkness

John Huston understands the crushing success of failure. In the rarely seen films Sinful Davey and Fat City, he observes the self-destructive behaviors and interactions of stunned and blasted losers as closely as Jane Austen would.

Television

Prime Time Larceny: It Takes a Thief

Al Mundy (Robert Wagner) enjoys a reputation as a world-class thief, a glamorous burglar, a pickpocket's pickpocket. Too bad he landed in prison.

Television

Clear! Old-School Medical Drama, Stat!

A once-popular medical drama reveals how much has changed in America's health care industry -- and its television medical dramas -- and how much remains the same.

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The Guys Who Bond in the Sky: 'Toward the Unknown'

All this aircraft is blatantly fetishized, with Bond at one point giving his plane an impulsive and passionate smack of the lips.

Television

Share the Stage, 'Glee' -- TV Feels a Song Coming On

The history of TV musicals is richer -- and stranger -- than you think. At least three sitcoms were singing long before Glee came along: That's Life, The Monkees and The Partridge Family. Before them, well, if I could sing it to you...

Film

'Cinema' --That's Italian for Cinema

New DVD provider RaroVideo USA is coming out of the gate with two lavish Criterion-worthy releases: The Clowns and the Fernando Di Leo Crime Collection. One is nominally "arty" and the other "lowdown", but the lines deserve to be blurred.

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