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'Becoming AFI' Might Have Benefited from a Good Scriptwriter's Input

The history of this important American cultural institution is vital and appreciated, of course. If only the text had more "life" and "color" in it, as a good film does.

Recent
Reviews

Studio One Anthology

Everything gold can stay: Studio One returns, on DVD.

Matthew Sorrento
Film

The Demise of Horror Culture?

While the horror classics of 1968 may have indeed revitalized the genre, few today are aware of these movies' impact on the canon...if they acknowledge them at all.

Film

Part 2: The Changing Face of Filmmaking

Every staid situation needs shaking up, none more so that the labored Hollywood studio system. The titles chosen for this section stand out as reasons why things had to change, the results of those seismic stylistic shifts.

Film

Future Shock: The Death of Serious Science Fiction

The serious Science Fiction film genre is dead or at least on cinematic life support. As the new millennial marches forward, and an omnipresent production paradigm that substitutes spectacle for smarts, futurist filmmaking is definitely gasping for breath.

Reviews

The Ten Commandments (50th Anniversary Edition) (1956)

It is the role that would provide Charlton Heston with fame, fortune, and the authoritative persona he now uses to convince people that hunting squirrels with AK-47s is not just a right but a duty.

John G. Nettles
Reviews

Planet of the Apes: The Legacy Collection (1968-1973)

Planet of the Apes: The Legacy Collection oscillates wildly between the delightful and the agonizing; but the rewards more than offset the pains.

Whitney Strub
Reviews

The Naked Jungle (1954)

What sets this Naked Jungle apart is a remarkably astute depiction of the collision of the sexes, in its addition of a mail order bride for the protagonist.

David Sanjek
Reviews

The Greatest Show on Earth (1952)

The circus crew is depicted as a cross between Santa's Workshop and the U.S. Army; they are impossibly virtuous, toiling endlessly for the delight of children.

Jesse Hassenger
Reviews

Bowling for Columbine (2002)

'John Ashcroft and his ilk are something to fear.'"

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Bowling for Columbine (2002)

Why are people scared? This question lies at the heart of Michael Moore's filmic essay on gun violence in the United States.

Cynthia Fuchs

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