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Books

Tommy Siegel's Comic 'I Hope This Helps' Pokes at Social Media Addiction

Jukebox the Ghost's Tommy Siegel discusses his "500 Comics in 500 Days" project, which is now a new book, I Hope This Helps.

Recent
Books

Isolation Resonates in Tomine's Ode to Loneliness

Tomine's talent in communicating the intimate, minute details of his life only serve to make them universal, even moreso in these times of COVID-19. The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist is his isolationist memoir.

Books

Collaboration Is Fruitful in Graphic Novel 'Old Growth'

In their collaborative graphic fiction, Old Growth, Olivo and Bavarksy drew in tandem, trading the panels back and forth, each adding new details, both and neither taking the role of primary artist-writer.

Books

French Comic Artist Blutch Makes an Experiment of 'Mitchum'

The images in Blutch's Mitchum are technically cartoons, but the style is idiosyncratic, sometimes warping into full abstraction.

Books

Classic Shōjo Today: Moto Hagio's 'The Poe Clan'

Moto Hagio's The Poe Clan manga series a gender-fluid melodrama marked by deep psychological trauma.

Books

John Pham's ​J​&K​​ - It's a Matter of Perspective

In J&K, John Pham explores perspectives in the psychological sense. Like Picasso, he views things from more than one angle.

Books

You Become the Watcher in Eric Haven's 'Cryptoid'

In his latest work, Cryptoid, Eric Haven takes an idiosyncratically weird approach to the horror genre of the Weird to produce a hybrid graphic novella that belongs to no genre but his own.

Books

Nazism Repackaged? A Closer Look at the "Fascist Subtext" of 'Attack on Titan'

Many fantasy writers have incorporated the visual footprint of the Third Reich into their fictional worlds. Few, however, have done so as extensively as the creator of Attack on Titan, who revisited this terrible chapter of history not to find inspiration for a fearsome antagonist, but to excavate the divisive ideas that lay buried there.

Books

The Two Worlds of Graphic Novel Umma's Table

Where fiction typically emphasizes plot, Yeon-Sik Hong's Umma's Table emphasizes a rich layering of events that creates the artful impression of memoir-like fiction.

Books

A Boy, a Dog, a Gang of Peanuts, and the Meaning of Life

For all the Charlie Browns in the world, Library of America has published The Peanuts Papers: Writers and Cartoonists on Charlie Brown, Snoopy & the Gang, and the Meaning of Life.

Books

'Horizontal Collaboration' Tackles Sexist Judgements on Women's Lives in War-Time

Horizontal Collaboration, the superb French comic by Navie and Carole Maurel, reassesses the sexist biases of history.

Books

Tsuge's 'The Man Without Talent' Is a Perfect Manga Parable on Capitalism's Failed Dreams

In The Man Without Talent, Tadao Tsuge captures the element of fantasy reflected in the childish utopianism of free market capitalism and the committed entrepreneurs who are its happy-go-lucky evangelists.

Books

Despair and Hope in Chris Ware's 'Rusty Brown'

Chris Ware's parallel storytelling, his ability to jump time periods, and his meticulous attention to detail create an immersive world in Pantheon Graphic Library's compilation, Rusty Brown.

Books

'Best American Comics 2019' Is Strange, Beautiful, and Challenging

Not all entries in Best American Comics 2019 will go down easily. Some might be undercooked. Some left too long on the fire. But the strongest will satisfy for a long time.

Books

Sometimes Words Are Just Too Blunt: Travis Dandro's 'King of King Court'

Travis Dandro's King of King Court is an excellent reminder of how evocatively effective comics are in the hands of a skilled memoirist.

Books

Inés Estrada's 'Alienation': Virtual Reality via Comics Grids

Inés Estrada's disturbingly plausible imagination effectively beams Alienation's dystopic future into readers' heads via the antiquated analog technology of ink and paper.

Books

'Apologetica', a Nihilistic God, and a Plastic Landscape

It's as if the objects of consumption have consumed their consumers in Ben O'Neil's absurdist Apologetica.

Books

Seth's 'Clyde Fans' and the Revolving Slowdown of a Declining Business

Seth's inspiration for the epic story, Clyde Fans, grew from an empty storefront and photographs of two middle-aged men; thus it is imbued with palpable sadness and regret.

Television

Never Ending Endings in 'The Avengers: Endgame' and 'Game of Thrones'

In both The Avengers: Endgame and Game of Thrones, the key conflicts are not between good and evil, as one might think, but between the beginnings and endings of their stories.

Television

The Catharsis of the Void in Anime Horror, 'Vampire Princess Miyu'

Within the 26 hard-to-find episodes of Vampire Princess Miyu, there are murders, suicide, and even murder-suicides. There really is something for everyone. So why did it fail?

Books

Taking Superheroes Seriously: Three Implications for Society Based on Travis Smith's 'Superhero Ethics'

How do we move from the tribal shouting to a more humane discourse with one another? Travis Smith's Superhero Ethics finds surprising solutions in the world of conflicting superheroes.

Comics

Doctor Strange and the Racial History of a Marvel Icon

The Asian legacy of Doctor Strange is more complex than you know.

Books

Love and Politics Go Awry in James Sturm's 'Off Season'

There's a pleasant "off-ness" about the not really reality within reality of James Sturms' graphic fiction, Off Season.

Books

Rikke Villadsen's Idiosyncratic 'The Sea' Sets the Imagination Adrift

Danish artist Rikke Villadsen appears to be spinning a circular tale-within-a-tale with no origin or end points and only tragic escapes in his graphic fiction work, The Sea.

Books

Michael DeForge's 'Brat' Challenges the Act of Reading Comics

While dimension-deforming environments are normal in cartoon worlds, few wander as far to the edge of pure abstraction—let alone cross it -- as Michael DeForge does in Brat.

Books

Nathan Gelgud's 'A House in the Jungle' Plays with Perception

Nathan Gelgud's image-within-an-image work in his latest, A House in the Jungle, echoes a larger world-within-a-world meta-context.

Books

'The Best American Comics 2018' Beautifully Showcases the Diversity and Creativity of the Medium

This year's collection includes many independent and self-published artists; no mainstream or superhero comic in sight.

Books

Graphic Fiction 'Roaming Foliage' Digs into the Undergrowth

Patrick Kyle's graphic fiction meta-garden, Roaming Foliage, digs up the roots of the comics form.

Books

Jon Morris' 'The League of Regrettable Sidekicks' Is Itself a Victim of Questionable Standards

Mere mediocrity on the part of the superhero sidekicks doesn't seem a high enough bar for inclusion in a tome such as The League of Regrettable Sidekicks.

Books

Behind Every Superhero Is One of These Clowns: 'The League of Regrettable Sidekicks'

Many of Jon Morris's characters in The League of Regrettable Sidekicks are proven to be a reflection of their times not only culturally but in terms of the evolution of the genre, as well.

Jon Morris
Books

The (Almost) Complete Julie Doucet

Doucet's creative id, whether awake or asleep, knows few boundaries—or rather seeks out boundaries to challenge.

Books

'Tales from La Vida' Opens Up the World of LatinX Comics

This anthology will remind you how much you are missing if you confine your interests to only the big-named comics creators.

Books

'Art Comic' Is a Comedic Comic of Artful Artlessness

Matthew Thurber's Art Comic lampoons the art world by wallowing in its shallowest waters.

Books

Jason Lutes, Author of 'Berlin', on Drawing War Comics and Resisting Fascism

As we learn in this interview, when Jason Lutes began drawing the Berlin series in the '90s, he had no idea his own country would be facing the threat of fascism, again, by the time he completed it.

Comics

Oh, Canada! (in Ass-kicking Comics)

It's probably to Canada's credit that it's never produced a best-selling superhero like Captain America. Instead, we've got five comics here that'll thrill one's identity politics for Canada Day -- and kick some ass, too.

Books

Can Comics Survive Changing Print and Digital Formats without Compromising Artistic Integrity?

Aaron Kashtan's Between Pen and Pixel is a deep exploration into your father's comics, your comics, and the future of comics.

Comics

Marvel's Avengers #1 Defends Old School Avenging

Captain America, Iron Man, and Thor return to their Avenging roots, but not without doubts.


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