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Film

A Fix of Fantasy: Reviving the Wondrous Films of Karel Zeman

The imaginative filmmaker Karel Zeman influenced many artists including Terry Gilliam, Tim Burton, fellow Czech Jan Švankmajer, the Brothers Quay, and animator Lawrence Jordan's recycling of classic 19th Century imagery.

Recent
Film

Embracing Nothing: Nihilism in Bellocchio's 'Fists in the Pocket'

Bellocchio's best work, Fists in the Pocket (I pugni in tasca) is key to understanding the stark shift Italian cinema experienced in moving from the post-realism phase of the 1950s into the experimentalism, social commentary, and surrealism of the 1960s.

Film

Spike Lee's 'Do the Right Thing' Remains Explosive and Vivid

The Criterion Collection's essential 30th anniversary Blu-ray package of Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing honors the film's heart, aesthetic brilliance, and pointed message on American racism, diversity, and community.

Film

War's Degradation of the Human in Bergman's 'Shame'

Ingmar Bergman's Shame is one of his few films so blatantly concerned with the impositions of the external world,as opposed to the internal, subjective aspects of life.

Film

Faceted Depictions of War: On Jan Němec's 'Diamonds of the Night' (Démanty noci)

Are fantasies mixed up with memories in Jan Němec's film adaptation of Arnošt Lustig's autobiographical story of surviving WWII, Diamonds of the Night (Démanty noci)? Will these babes forever be in the woods?

Film

Jackie Chan's High-Kicking '80s Cop Movies Are Back!

Re-releases of Police Story and Police Story 2 show writer-director-star Jackie Chan in his finest fighting style -- along with his usual over mugging for the camera.

Film

David Byrne Channels the Weird and the Ordinary in 'True Stories'

As a piece of both cultural history and film history, David Byrne's True Stories takes its place alongside two other films from the mid-'80s that are also steeped in a surrealistic other-worldly place, Repo Man and Blue Velvet.

Film

At the Crossroads of Pity and Revolt: Intensity and Time in Lino Brocka's 'Manila in the Claws of Light'

Lino Brocka's Manila in the Claws of Light seethes with rage against colonial oppression without ever becoming overt agitprop.

Film

On Mishima, and Feeling That One Exists

Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters is a singular portrait of an artist's life lived so fiercely as to have left an indelible mark on an alienated world seeking affirmation for its own existence.

Film

The Fog of the Interstitial: Existential Disaffection in Alea's 'Memories of Underdevelopment'

In Tomás Gutiérrez Alea's film the protagonist is an inhabitant too estranged from his country to belong, a tourist too familiar with his environment to experience the passing joy of surprise.

Film

On Susan Seidelman's Film of Aimless Desire, 'Smithereens'

The experiences you have in NYC are not the best experiences to be had, the sex you have is not the best sex, the friends you make are not the best of all possible friends—but they ought to be.

Film

Hannibal Lecter May Be 'The Silence of the Lambs' Icon But Clarice Starling Is the Movie

The Criterion edition of 1991's The Silence of the Lambs reminds us what the film has always stood for: Don't underestimate Clarice.

Film

Suffering the Inscrutable: The Ethics of the Face in Dreyer's 'The Passion of Joan of Arc'

The film is imbued with a painterly quality wherein the not-quite static framing of the human visage is its main concern, its aesthetic gambit, and the source of its affective impact.

Film

Like Real Life 'Election' Is Dark, Hilarious, and Cringe-worthy

Alexander Payne's 1999 cult black comedy about high school politics is ripe for a revisit, and Criterion is up to the task.

Film

Criterion's 'Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me' Is a Semiotic Feast

Sheryl Lee's iconic performance as Laura Palmer evokes epic sorrow and haunting tragedy.

Film

And Now for Something Not So Different: Terry Gilliam's 'Jabberwocky'

Jabberwocky takes the enticingly evocative, nearly blank canvas of Lewis Carroll's poem and fills it with a parody of medieval banalities that make the film a grimier, far less amusing companion to Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

Film

Jean-Pierre Melville’s 'Le Samouraï' Plays with the Perils of the Loner

Under the lens of cultural and historical context, as well as understanding the reflective nature of popular culture, it's hard not to read this film as a cautionary tale about the limitations of isolationism.

Film

The Poetry of Heartbreak in 'The Umbrellas of Cherbourg'

Jacques Demy's dazzling musical explores a realistic side of love -- one that doesn’t always lead to a happy ending.

Film

Observe and Report: The Ethics of 'Cameraperson'

Cameraperson is observational in ways both purer and more complex than much of what appears in documentaries edited to appear as objective works.

Film

'The Tree of Wooden Clogs' Is Extraordinary in Its Depiction of Tenant Farmers

In a world of absolutes and cruel consequences, if an entire family’s future is destroyed due to the cutting of a single tree, then that’s simply how things are.

Film

The Criterion Edition of 'Cat People' Leaves an Indelible Impression

The horror master Val Lewton is immortalized in this excellent reissue of his first (and possibly best) film, Cat People.

Reviews

Painful Humor and Euphoric Pleasure In 'Punch-Drunk Love'

Anderson's quirky film is reinvention in the purest sense, free of commercial pressure.

Film

'Gilda' Is an Invitation to Look Deeper Into Pop Culture

Beautiful, classic, important, and thoroughly complex, Gilda is a real “aficionado” film, and yet it has an undeniable popular appeal.

Film

There Are No Accidents on 'Mulholland Drive'

David Lynch's Mulholland Drive unfolds in a series of desires, warnings, and deals that are often made under duress by unseen malevolent forces, or motivated by darkness within.

Reviews

Brian de Palma's 'Dressed to Kill' Is Still Sexy, Still Shocking, Still Classic

Dressed to Kill doesn't address itself to every viewer, but for those who love horror and the tradition of suspense that de Palma so expertly participates in, it will always deliver.

Film

Where Have You Gone, Monsieur Hulot?

Persistent themes of Jacques Tati’s films were work and play, two forces in conflicting or complementary relationships, always inspiring creativity regardless of configuration.

Reviews

'Time Bandits' Gets Darker With the Viewer's Age

Watching Time Bandits as an adult isn't a letdown by any means, but It's not the wonder-filled experience of youth, either.

Games

Why Don't Videogames Have Their Own Criterion Collection?

Though the video game industry bases itself on forward progression, the rich history of the medium is being underserved by the lack of preservation for older, essential games.

Miguel Penabella
Film

'The Long Day Closes' Recollects Memory and Childhood in Constant Motion

One of cinema's most resonant and timeless works, Terence Davies's second film recreates childhood dreams and memories within which any viewer can situate themselves.

Film

A Little Ominous Noir Music Makes Jules Dassin's 'Rifif' Nearly Perfect

This benchmark of the heist genre shows that for the criminal, elegance and brutality go hand-in-hand, never more vividly depicted than in this tightly structured ode to Paris.

Film

Yasujiro Ozu Explores the Cost of Eliminating Conflict

Criterion's Blu-ray re-release of Tokyo Story situates it in the context of Yasujiro Ozu's life and career, his most accessible work, yet one which still holds back secrets.

Reviews

'The Uninvited' Could Be the Nucleus for all American Narrative Horror Cinema

The disparate influences, caginess, and behind-the-scenes difficulties in The Uninvited make for an intoxicating snapshot of a genre on the verge of popular acceptance.

Reviews

If You Tickle Us, Do We Not Laugh?

The Criterion release of Ernst Lubitsch's farcical antidote for Nazism, To Be or Not To Be proves worthy of a masterpiece, with a pristine transfer and extras that illustrate how only he could have done it.

Film

Dignity and Physical Drama in the Films of John-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

La Promesse and Rosetta treat seriously the ambitions and spirits of society’s most overlooked individuals, lest they be left by the wayside.

Reviews

'Down by Law' Is More Than Just Another Quirky Indie Film

Down by Law is only Jarmusch's third feature but already shows his confidence in crafting a unique style.

Reviews

'High and Low': This Is Not Your Typical Mindless Rich Guy

Akira Kurosawa makes a daring attempt to tell an epic story of rich businessmen, determined cops, and the low-end criminals and drug addicts struggling to survive.

Reviews

'Black Orpheus (Orfeu Negro)' Will Leave You Breathless

No one can resist the breathtaking beauty or the heart-breaking love story of Orfeu Negro, Marcel Camus' 1959 award-winning masterpiece, which is now available as a Criterion Collection release.

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