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Hitchcock 101: Day Eleven, 1969 - 1976

In his final three films, Hitchcock may have showed his age, but there are undeniable treasures to be found even in these lesser works.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Nine, 1959 - 1960

About 50 years ago Hitchcock followed his artistic masterpiece with two of the most important movies ever to emerge from Hollywood. Two very different pictures, each was to chart a course for an entire genre.

Film

Hitchcock, Haneke and the Psycho-Sexual Voyeur Apparatus

“The film knows that it is being watched, and yet does not know,” says Christian Metz. “The one who knows is the cinema, the institution..."

Ian Burkett
Film

The Primal Drive of Fear and Desire in Hitchcock’s 'Vertigo' and 'The Birds'

Typical of Hitchcock, he does not provide answers in Vertigo and The Birds, rather, he demonstrates the inherent dangers of living with -- yet denying -- the dark psychic forces that control our lives from deep withing our subconscious minds.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Eight, 1956 - 1958

Now entering his creative peak, Hitchcock revisited some older material, reinvigorating it with a global politics and a big budget grandeur.

Film

Hitchcock and Homework: The Rewards and Perils of Hitchcock in the High School English Class

To what degree should a teacher help a student develop taste? Hitchcock stands as one of hundreds of artists whose work educators might use to explore questions of art and the classroom itself with their students.

Brian Keaney
Film

Hitchcock 101: Day Seven, 1954 - 1955

Many film fans consider Hitchcock’s career to have really begun in about 1951 (with Strangers on a Train) and to have ended in 1963 (with The Birds).

Film

The Modern Prometheus: Creature and Creator in 'Vertigo' and 'Psycho'

Just as Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley famous novel creates what turns out to be a monstrosity, so also does Scottie in Vertigo and Norman Bates in Psycho.

Andrew W. M. Smith
Film

Hitchcock 101: Day Six, 1948 - 1954

In this sixth installment of our overview of Hitchcock’s oeuvre, we take a look at his most divisive period -- a string of wildly inconsistent material ranging from masterpieces to films we didn’t even bother reviewing.

Film

Hitchcock, Zeal and the Velvet Rope

More than almost any other of the great directors, Hitchcock filled his films with characters that are either explicitly or implicitly coded as gay. And almost always as villainous.

Diepiriye Kuku
Film

Hitchcock 101: Day Five, 1944 - 1946

Three films of the mid-1940s found Hitchcock in an experimental mode. One takes place entirely in a small boat, another explores the idea of the psychedelic, and the third stretches out into the territory of film noir, while animating the post-war sense of global interconnectedness that presaged the Cold War.

Film

The Puppeteer of Suspense

No one likes being toyed with, but Hitchcock makes it clear that he is in control; he is directing us, influencing how we think and react to the situation at hand -- and we love him for it.

David Charpentier
Film

"Some of My Best Friends Are in Concentration Camps": The Absence of Jews in Hitchcock's WWII Films

Although Hitchcock made several films expressing his opposition to the Nazis, viewing these films leads to the question: Where was any mention of the Jews who were so profoundly affected by the Nazis and WWII?

Michael Rennett
Film

Hitchcock 101: Day Four, 1941 - 1943

As the war in Europe raged, Hitchcock remained in the relative safety of his adopted home far from the bombs that rocked his home country, but Hitch put together a series of fascinating movies dealing with themes of betrayal, paranoia, deceit, and the creeping horror of doubt.

Film

Hitchcock 101: Day Three, 1940 - 1941

New to Hollywood, it didn’t take long for Hitchcock to master his surroundings, winning the Best Picture Oscar with his first American film. Then, it was on to a series of iffy studio experiments, including perhaps the most bizarre entry in his oeuvre, a screwball comedy starring Carole Lombard!

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