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Film

2017 Fall Film Preview: At Last, the Film Industry Awakens From Its Slumber

From Gary Oldman in The Darkest Hour to James Franco's meta-experiment Blade Runner: 2049 and Daniel Day-Lewis's final role, here are the movies you'll want to watch ... and a couple you might not.

Recent
Film

The Stultifying Speeches of 'The Monuments Men'

Theoretically an adventure film about saving the culture of the Western World from rampaging Nazi philistines, George Clooney's first serious misstep as a director is somehow both painfully serious and trite.

Film

Toronto International Film Festival 2011: 'The Ides of March'

This dark, angry movie wants to be a smart, keep-you-guessing political thriller but winds up a wildly improbable and deeply cynical melodrama.

Reviews

'The American' Is a Thoughtful, Deceptively Spare Work Rife with Political Intrigues

Jack is hardly the protypical "Ugly American", but he is an "American", with all that that signifies to the skeptical Left.

Books

Solarian Absurdity

In his classic SF novel Solaris, Stanislaw Lem composes an ode to the absurdity of the human struggle for knowledge. No better is this struggle encapsulated than in the infinite expanse of space and in the discovery of new worlds.

Marcus How
Music

ArmsBendBack: ArmsBendBack

I hate to be this scathing, but when each song sounds like a variation on three chords with a wah-wah solo tacked on for good measure, your time is better spent elsewhere.

Film

Part 3: The Sixth Sense to Fight Club (August - October 1999)

Films that have left a lasting impression on their creators (M. Night Shyamalan, Sam Mendes, David Fincher) make up the majority of Part Three of our Films of 1999 overview.

Film

Part 2: The Virgin Suicides to The Blair Witch Project (May - August 1999)

In Part Two of our look at the most memorable films of 1999, we experience music, foul-mouthed mayhem, and a late, great auteur's final cinematic statement.

Film

Part 1: The Thin Red Line to Star Wars Episode I (January - May 1999)

The first part of PopMatters' look back at the films of 1999 is bookended by the long awaited return of two cinematic auteurs of wildly different styles, Terrence Malick and George Lucas.

Film

The New Classics - The 30 Best Films of 2008

Unlike previous years, where classics came crawling out of the celluloid woodwork with regular reckless abandon, 2008 was more calm… and considered. That's not to say that choosing 30 top titles was hard. The difficulty in placing them in some manner of rank order suggests the actual depth of quality involved.

Film

OMG - The 20 Worst Films of 2008

There's bad, and then there's 2008 level bad. You know this list is looking down into a deep dark bottomless pit of cinematic despair when Mike Myers' shameful Love Guru didn't even make the Top 20!

Film

Iconic - The Top 20 Male Performances of 2008

Like the gladiators of old, 2008 resembles a battle of formidable acting gods, especially when looking over the 20 choices presented below. Indeed, if anything, choosing a winner requires more of a leap of faith than any amount of critical skill - they all were that good.

Reviews

Burn After Reading

Ozzie (John Malkovich) embodies the problem of the CIA, of the "intelligence community," which is that it reacts to data, then fashions a story about it to comport with the reaction.

Film

Talk, Talk, Talk: September 2008

From wars both past and present to a number of nail-biting thrillers, September is sizing up as a potentially profitable one.

Reviews

Leatherheads

Pleasant and clever, Leatherheads is not built for surprises.

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A Gallery of Good Works: The Best Films of 2007

From Julian Schnabel's artsy The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to the legendary Coen Brothers splendid adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men, PopMatters counts down the 30 best films of 2007.

Featured: Top of Home Page

Performance Art: The Best Acting of 2007 - Female

From the most sweetly nuanced performance of Jennifer Jason Leigh's career to Cate Blanchett's revelatory portrayal of Bob Dylan in I'm Not There, the women of 2007 were stellar.

Featured: Top of Home Page

Performance Art: The Best Acting of 2007 - Male

From the tender and eerie precision of Sam Riley's depiction of Joy Division singer Ian Curtis in Control to yet another superlative performance by Daniel Day-Lewis in There Will Be Blood, PopMatters highlights the best male actors of 2007.

Television

Sand and Sorrow

The outrage of the continuing genocide in Darfur -- that it has been named, the numbers are known, and witnesses have testified -- makes Sand and Sorrow matter.

Reviews

Movies 101

Movies101invites you to audit the NYU course with a Special Edition, four-DVD box set with interviews with 16 recent guests including Martin Scorsese, Jennifer Aniston, George Clooney, Willem Dafoe, and Julianne Moore.

Gavin Williamson
Reviews

Darfur Now

The documentary showcases small steps, its subjects' work moment by moment to confront a crisis that appears overwhelming -- to feed one child, shelter one rape victim.

Film

Michael Clayton

The film's strength lies in its poetic inclinations, its meditation on the ways that money, politics, and fear shape moral choices.

Reviews

The Good German (2006)

Instead of a deeply involving present-tense drama, we get an essay on how such dramas used to look and work.

Brian Holcomb
Reviews

Oceans Thirteen (2007)

Every time George Clooney or Bernie Mac admits to the lameness of Number Two, the third film in the franchise can't help but promise improvement.

Film

Monkey Business (Part 2: June)

Apparently, as the sun's strongest rays finally settle over the movie going public, sequels are the remedy to cool down an overheated demographic. This month alone holds five examples of such redux refreshment. The rest of the choices are a variety pack of genres, ideas and possibilities.

Reviews

The Good German (2006)

The Good German's visual evocations of 1940s movies only underscore its many deconstructions, of nostalgia, heroism, and political coherence.

Reviews

Syriana (2005)

If you come away with nothing else from Syriana, it's that this concept -- winning -- is an illusion, at least in any sort of long run.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Good Night, and Good Luck (2005)

Lamenting the loss of 'people who are uncompromising,' Clooney says, 'For us, this movie is a success if some kid in Austin, Texas sees it, who is studying journalism, and says, 'That's the guy I want to be like.' Then we win.'"

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Syriana (2005)

This Middle Eastern spy thriller is complex and earnest, a film that repays close attention.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Good Night, and Good Luck (2005)

Shot in exquisite black and white, George Clooney's portrait of Edward R. Murrow is partly reverential, partly probing.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

K Street

What does make K Street fascinating is the pinpoint accuracy with which it details the day-to-day lives of its principals.

James Oliphant
Film

Intolerable Cruelty (2003)

The Coen brothers' latest venture is a rat-a-tat romantic comedy of the Preston Sturges persuasion, at least for its first hour or so.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Solaris (2002)

'The one thing you'll see as you watch the film, what you'll take note of, is how still it is.'"

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002)

His redemption, Barris abruptly realizes, can come only in detailed recollection, specifically, in his decision to confess his many sins.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Solaris (2002)

The liveliest moments in Steven Soderbergh's Solaris belong to Jeremy Davies' hands.

Cynthia Fuchs

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