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Film

Roger Michell's Homage to Godard Leaves Its Characters Literally Breathless

Roger Michell and Hanif Kureishi reunite in Le Week-End, a surprisingly uncompromising portrait of a long, restless marriage.

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Film

Part 5: Toy Story 2 to Titus (November - December 1999)

On this final day of PopMatters' 1999 overview, awards season hype gives way to pure acting prowess and definitive directorial flair.

Reviews

Inkheart

The screenplay follows a listless episodic structure, in which one barely connected segment follows another without cumulatively charging the overarching story.

Lesley Smith
Film

OMG - The 20 Worst Films of 2008

There's bad, and then there's 2008 level bad. You know this list is looking down into a deep dark bottomless pit of cinematic despair when Mike Myers' shameful Love Guru didn't even make the Top 20!

Film

Celulloid Culpability - Top 10 Film Guilty Pleasures of 2008

Like comedy or music, one's choice in cinematic pleasure can be very personal - and very peculiar. Take this tantalizing list of shameful indulgences. You can argue over their artistic value, but their individuals rewards definitely speak to those who champion them.

Film

Cinema Qua Non - Indispensable DVDs: Part 3

Day Three - The final ten, a cross-culture collection teeming with big ideas, larger than life visions, and perhaps the greatest documentary on rugby you've probably never heard of.

Film

Katrin Cartlidge: The Working Actress

Whether it was through silence, grotesquerie, fury or intelligence (or, at times, lack of intelligence), Cartlidge was not afraid to upturn the dark corners of the women she portrayed.

Reviews

When Did You Last See Your Father?

Even as it explores familiar deceits and self-delusions, When Did You Last See Your Father? feels, in the end, as if it's entangled in them.

Reviews

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

It is a little surprising to see the silliness that leads to Crystal Skull's gargantuan climax, a series of antics simultaneously hyper and enervated.

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The Return of the Popcorn Circus: May 2008

In the first act of this four-part production, Tinsel Town decides to do some unbelievable front loading. Will there be room for independent offerings, or former HBO carnal comedy divas? Who knows? Without a doubt, it's an interesting way to start the season.

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Digital Dynamite: The 30 Best DVDs of 2007

It was the year of the behemoth box set, the multi-disc triumph that tried to give long suffering fans everything their demanding little digital hearts ever desired. Here are PopMatters' 30 picks for the best DVDs of the year.

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A Gallery of Good Works: The Best Films of 2007

From Julian Schnabel's artsy The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to the legendary Coen Brothers splendid adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men, PopMatters counts down the 30 best films of 2007.

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Performance Art: The Best Acting of 2007 - Male

From the tender and eerie precision of Sam Riley's depiction of Joy Division singer Ian Curtis in Control to yet another superlative performance by Daniel Day-Lewis in There Will Be Blood, PopMatters highlights the best male actors of 2007.

Television

Longford: Next to Godliness

If Longford were just the story of a flawless saint, it wouldn’t be very interesting. Instead, we see a nuanced portrait of a complicated and imperfect man.

Boyd Williamson
Reviews

Hot Fuzz (2007)

Hot Fuzz is all about the guys. And who needs girls when you have guns?

Daynah Burnett
Film

The PopMatters 'Short Ends & Leader' Spring Film Preview

In order to separate the worthy from the worthless, PopMatters' "Short Ends & Leader" editor is highlighting 10 new films he's looking forward to this spring.

Bill Gibron
Reviews

The Street - The Complete First Season

What distinguishes The Street from the vast majority of shows on television today is its quiet attention to naturalistic, fully textured, and thoroughly complicated characters.

Kate Williams
Reviews

Art School Confidential (2006)

While director Terry Zwigoff seemed to have held the patent on this sort of offbeat tone in his past work, his kooky rudeness is his undoing, here

Film

Art School Confidential (2006)

As much as Jerome's harsh appraisals of his peers and teachers appear to be warranted, Art School Confidential doesn't exactly endorse his aspirations.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (2005)

The scariest scene in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe comes at the start.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

The Good Father (1985)

Within minutes of its start, Mike Newell's The Good Father has thus established Bill's rage.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Robots (2005)

Valiant and righteous, the old-fashioned robots fight back against the slick, wealthy, huge machine.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Bridget Jones's Diary: Collector's Edition (2001)

Speaking of her star, Renée Zellweger, Maguire is appropriately besotted: 'You can see what she brought to Bridget. She's got this fantastic warmth and this permanent confusion on her face.'"

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (2004)

This time the bloom is quite off.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Around the World in 80 Days (2004)

'Actually,' Frank Coraci begins his commentary for Around the World in 80 Days, 'I never wanted to do a director's commentary.'"

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Bright Young Things (2004)

Stephen Fry can't throw us any curveballs because he's got to stick close to Waugh, so he subjects us to formulaic depravity for three-quarters of the film, with minor variations.

Dan Devine
Film

Around the World in 80 Days (2004)

The absolutely scariest scene in Around the World in 80 Days features Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Gangs of New York (2002)

Daniel Day-Lewis wears a tall stovepipe hat in Martin Scorsese's long-awaited Gangs of New York.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

The Gathering Storm

The point in 'The Gathering Storm' is that Churchill is 'human', that he has faults.

Tracy McLoone

Reviews
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