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Film

When Jim Jarmusch's 'Dead Man' Walks Into Your Mind, He Never Leaves

It's not enough to describe Dead Man as simply an anti-western; it's an iconoclastic deconstruction of late 19th Century American values and mores, many of which remain unabated more than a century later.

Recent
Film

The Last Witch Hunt: The Legacy of the West Memphis Three

Teenage outcasts often feel like the world is against them; in 1994, three adolescents in West Memphis, Arkansas, experienced proof that it actually was. Now, despite being freed after 18 years of wrongful imprisonment, the battle of the West Memphis Three is not concluded.

Books

Machine Guns and Metaphors: Outlaw Poet Todd Moore Remembered

The tough, vernacular, and outsider writer Todd Moore became an icon of Outlaw Poetry; he disdained academia, embraced gangsters like John Dillinger, and made American poetry pulse with dark blood.

Film

Super Spots or Big Blunders

A lot of production, distribution, and marketing companies spent a lot of time and a lot of money to air ads for movies that are six months away. Which ones will make them a lot of money instead of costing exactly that?

Reviews

Arizona Dream: Warner Archive Collection

An interesting historical document, coming as it did before Johnny Depp's super-stardom and at the beginnings of "Indiewood".

Reviews

Alice

We get a lot of characterization in a short time, including Alice’s abandonment issues and the tough-as-nails karate persona she uses to battle bad guys throughout the film.

Film

Rags to Riches: The Fangirl Phenomena

Take a quick look at fangirl history and you will realize that fangirls’ devotion has “made” some of the most significant players in pop culture history. Fangirls are one of the primary drivers in popular media and today they are more empowered than ever before.

Faith Korpi
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SpongeBob SquarePants: The First 100 Episodes

SpongeBob SquarePants: The First 100 Episodes - Nickelodeon [$117]

Music

Glenn Tilbrook and the Fluffers: Pandemonium Ensues

Pandemonium Ensues is Glenn Tilbrook's third solo album since fronting Squeeze, and though it suffers from some spotty moments, it provides plenty of the magical melodic gifts for which Tilbrook is known, along with several pleasing sonic surprises.

Film

Summer of Same: July 2009

In a rare attempt at novelty, July jets along with only Harry Potter and the Ice Age crew sampling continuing series spoils. The rest provide unknown pleasures.

Film

Part 4: All About My Mother to Sleepy Hollow (October - November 1999)

Outsiders and oddballs make up Part Four's formidable filmmakers, an idiosyncratic collection of dreamers and visionaries.

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Off the Radar - The Top 30 DVDs of 2008

Oddly enough, while the major studios continue scratching their heads over how to sell yet another new format (Blu-ray) to disinterested consumers, several outside distributors made sure that this would be a digital year to remember.

Film

Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

While Gonzo makes a familiar case, that Thompson frequently lost himself in celebrity, it also argues for his legacy, not cynicism but optimism.

Reviews

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

Burton indulges in meticulously designed, deliberately artificial sets, cinematography that makes the world monochromatic, protagonists with pale skin and sunken eyes – but it's that passion coursing beneath the surface that makes this film feel more alive than anything he's done in years.

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A Gallery of Good Works: The Best Films of 2007

From Julian Schnabel's artsy The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to the legendary Coen Brothers splendid adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men, PopMatters counts down the 30 best films of 2007.

Film

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

Sweeney Todd is delirious with blood and violence: bright red spurting from the barber's expert slashes, necks snapping and bodies crumpling.

Reviews

Pirates of the Caribbean: At Worlds End

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End is actually awful enough to inspire appreciation for the games that get its flaws right.

L.B. Jeffries
Reviews

Pirates of the Caribbean: At Worlds End (2007)

In the just-in-time for Memorial Day weekend Pirates sequel, Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) pursues pleasure with the sort of determination usually associated with moviegoers.

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Full Frame 3: The Bad, the Ugly, the Cute and the Delicious

Subversive behavior is encouraged, girl-watching is indulged, Hunter S. Thompson gets some respect, and the pig-out at the wrap-up Awards Barbeque begins.

Kevin Greer, Jyllian Gunther, and Isaac Miller
Reviews

Brando

Brando is most original and inspiring when it looks at Brando's other work. As Bobby Seale remembers, "If I said, 'Constitutional democratic civil human rights,' I mean, it lit him up."

Film

Monkey Business (Part 1: May)

Talk about frontloading your approach. Each week in this first full month of patented popcorn movies finds another famous franchise icon making a major blockbuster bow. Only truly disastrous results from these guaranteed crowd-pleasers will keep the coffers from clogging with cash.

Reviews

The Libertine (2004)

Rochester is "a beaten man," observes writer-director Laurence Dunmore, "Whilst he sort of knee-jerks the defiance."

Film

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (2006)

Demented and punctuated by Depp's scowls and "oofs," Jack Sparrow's stunty bits are mostly amusing and sometimes even surprising.

Film

The Libertine (2004)

John Wilmot, the Second Earl of Rochester (Johnny Depp), is always the smartest guy in the room.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory: Two-Disc Deluxe Edition (2005)

Tim Burton's movie is mostly perky, slightly edgy, and dully episodic.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005)

This being a Tim Burton film, the celebration of childish pleasures is not simply joyous, but tweaked.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Finding Neverland (2004)

'Play' is a means to define childhood, to prolong mythic innocence, to grant nobility.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Finding Neverland (2004)

As James Barrie, the Scottish-born playwright most famous for imagining Peter Pan, Johnny Depp appears the consummately charismatic child-man.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Secret Window (2004)

'Johnny's look,' says director David Koepp, 'mostly came from Johnny'.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Secret Window (2004)

The foremost asset of this Stephen King adaptation is the wondrous Johnny Depp.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Once Upon a Time in Mexico (2003)

If ever there was a filmmaker made for DVD commentaries, it is Robert Rodriguez.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews
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