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Film

The Rich Humanism of Sebastián Lelio's 'Gloria Bell'

For those curious about what awaits them on the other side of youth, writer-director Sebastián Lelio's indie drama Gloria Bell offers an unflinching glimpse at some unforgiving terrain.

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Reviews

'6 Souls' Isn't As Awful As Everybody's Saying

Prepare yourself for some radical psychiatric mumbo jumbo and some pseudo-philosophical ramblings that would sound ponderous even to a freshman pausing between bong rips.

Reviews

Julianne Moore Is in Class in 'The English Teacher'

Linda's (Julianne Moore) misreading of herself and her surroundings allows her some measure of solace and also structures The English Teacher.

Renée Scolaro Mora
Film

The Thinking Man’s Man-Candy: Nicholas Hoult in 'A Single Man'

Young British actor Nicholas Hoult, at 20, has already been acting for 17 years. Currently, in A Single Man, he is romancing Colin Firth. Hoult recently spoke about being an object of desire, growing up on film sets and the multitude of amazing actresses with whom he has shared the screen.

Film

Part 5: Toy Story 2 to Titus (November - December 1999)

On this final day of PopMatters' 1999 overview, awards season hype gives way to pure acting prowess and definitive directorial flair.

Film

Woolf at the Door

Both Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Michael Cunningham's The Hours offer an illuminating look at the choices we make, the roles we play, and the hours that hinge our lives together.

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Off the Radar - The Top 30 DVDs of 2008

Oddly enough, while the major studios continue scratching their heads over how to sell yet another new format (Blu-ray) to disinterested consumers, several outside distributors made sure that this would be a digital year to remember.

Reviews

Blindness

If its political metaphor is plain, the aesthetic allusions are more intriguing, as Blindness works to show what can't be shown, to find a visual language for what's not visual.

Film

In the Land of the Blind

Fernando Meirelles’ adaptation of Jose Saramago’s Blindness fails because the source material doesn’t easily lend itself to cinema, and because the filmmaker is clearly out of his depth.

Reviews

The Big Lebowski: 10th Anniversary Edition

A generation-defining comedy about peace and brotherhood, set in a world of backstabbers, liars, and semi-professional bowling leagues.

Film

Talk, Talk, Talk: September 2008

From wars both past and present to a number of nail-biting thrillers, September is sizing up as a potentially profitable one.

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I'm Not There, and Neither Are You

The Bob Dylan film, I’m Not There, shows that the main puzzle behind pop music’s most enigmatic personality resides right here, within us all.

George Reisch, Peter Vernezze and Paul Lulewicz
Reviews

Savage Grace

Based on the Baekelands' true and infamous story, Tom Kalin's Savage Grace, like his wondrous Swoon (1992), considers the dysfunctions produced by wealth and leisure.

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A Gallery of Good Works: The Best Films of 2007

From Julian Schnabel's artsy The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to the legendary Coen Brothers splendid adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men, PopMatters counts down the 30 best films of 2007.

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Performance Art: The Best Acting of 2007 - Female

From the most sweetly nuanced performance of Jennifer Jason Leigh's career to Cate Blanchett's revelatory portrayal of Bob Dylan in I'm Not There, the women of 2007 were stellar.

Reviews

Movies 101

Movies101invites you to audit the NYU course with a Special Edition, four-DVD box set with interviews with 16 recent guests including Martin Scorsese, Jennifer Aniston, George Clooney, Willem Dafoe, and Julianne Moore.

Gavin Williamson
Reviews

Next

Suspense and that familiar adrenaline rush come with creativity, not clock crunching. Next fails to fully understand this, and ends up paying for it in the end.

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Part 5: The Return of the Auteur

That noise you heard near the start of the new millennium was the creative din of a brash new breed of filmmakers tearing down the traditions of mainstream moviemaking. Their motion picture mission statements -- including the ones featured on this list -- remain the rulebook for new generations of anxious film artists.

Film

Future Shock: The Death of Serious Science Fiction

The serious Science Fiction film genre is dead or at least on cinematic life support. As the new millennial marches forward, and an omnipresent production paradigm that substitutes spectacle for smarts, futurist filmmaking is definitely gasping for breath.

Reviews

Next (2007)

The film doesn’t try to explain or rationalize its essential trick, but drops you rather perfunctorily into Cris' multiple dilemmas.

Reviews

Trust the Man (2005)

Trust the Man is definitely enjoyable: as one of the guiltiest of pleasures that you only watch at home during the cold, dark winter, with the curtains drawn, alone and in shame with a whole bag of potato chips.

Matt Mazur
Film

The Pay Off: The Best Film of 2006

For many of the movies on PopMatters' 2006 list of the year's best films, it is clear that a heavy personal and professional stake was riding on the final product.

Reviews

Children of Men (2007)

Even with so much attention paid to her body and to her child, Kee's story is secondary to Theo's, as his loss of hope must be undone and his past redressed.

Film

Trust the Man (2005)

Trust the Man is primarily focused on women trusting men, because the men find it nearly impossible to trust each other.

Film

Freedomland (2006)

The new Samuel L. Jackson and Julianne Moore thriller is full of hauntings, institutional and personal.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio (2005)

Prize Winner goes through odd motions to set Evelyn's taxing context and her admirable survival, its most extraordinary moment turns surreal.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Short Cuts (1993)

Death, or that state 'beyond natural color', is Short Cuts' common denominator.

Daniel Mudie Cunningham
Film

The Forgotten (2004)

In The Forgotten, the ethical terms are laid out: it's good to remember, fervently, and it's weak and bad to forget.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

The Laws of Attraction (2004)

All this back-and-forth is tedious, in part because it means that Audrey and Daniel spend a lot of time together.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

The Laws of Attraction (2004)

Daniel inhabits a universe where his judgments, his desires, and his insights (no matter how obnoxious, self-serving, or willfully blind) are always right.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

The Hours (2002)

'What I learned seeing the movie is that yes, you do lose that ability to go into people's minds, but you gain Meryl Streep's ability to separate an egg, in a way that tells you everything you need to know about who that person is at that point.'"

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

The Hours (2002)

The women are also functions of a coherent narrative, made comprehensible as embodiments of historical patterns.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Far From Heaven (2002)

For Haynes, much of this surface is simultaneously supple and precise, 'girly-swirly,' as he terms it.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Far From Heaven (2002)

Just beneath this conservative façade lies a complicated and progressive commentary on the present that Todd Haynes leaves to the viewer to interpret.

Lucas Hilderbrand
Reviews
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