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Human Connections, Missed Connections, Chance Connections: 'Three Colors: Blue, White, Red'

Krzysztof Kieślowski avoids explicit political and religious tautology to make a case for faith that is wholly human -- and humane.

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The Hoax

The film does not shy away from the innate unlikability of its leading man and it also explores, cannily, the damage one person’s dishonesty can inflict upon everyone around them.

Film

A Tough Road for Hollywood's Female Film Directors

Like most big-time movie directors, Kasi Lemmons had a studio driver to take her to and from the set of her new film, Talk to Me. "He said he'd driven 130 directors," Lemmons recalled. "And I was the first woman director he'd driven."

Mary F. Pols
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2 Days in Paris

This mostly comic study of two people coming apart is by turns lumpy and lovely, perverse and prosaic.

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Part 4: Challenging Convention

As cinema went completely commercial, abandoning art for artifice, true aesthetic acumen was hard to come by. Luckily, for the movies included herein, it was their difference, as well as their diversity, that helped them stand out from the rest of the high concept hackwork.

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The Hoax (2006)

Even as The Hoax works to wring emotional consequence from its many layers of lies, you're hard-pressed to believe it.

Film

Broken Flowers (2005)

A sort of minimalist male melodrama, Broken Flowers tracks a journey through regret and hope.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Before Sunset (2004)

Before Sunset illustrates the beautiful and frustrating complexity of human hearts seeking love and meaning in a life we know to be transient.

Michael Healey
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Three Colors Trilogy: Blue, White, Red (Trois Couleurs: Bleu, Blanc, Rouge)

Taken together, Blue, White, and Red are a visionary swan song for one of European cinema's most poetic moralists.

Michael S. Smith
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