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Film

Olivier Assayas' 'Non-Fiction' Fiddles with Seriousness

In Olivier Assayas' speedy, slightly wan dispatch from salon society, Non-Fiction (Doubles vie), Parisians have badly concealed affairs and argue loudly but inconclusively about books and society.

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Film

Cannes 2012: Day 10 - 'Cosmopolis' + '11.25' +'The Taste of Money'

David Cronenberg directs and writes this adaptation of Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, Koji Wakamatsu's take on Yukio Mishima in 11.25, and the really weak The Taste of Money from Korea's Im Sang-soo.

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Human Connections, Missed Connections, Chance Connections: 'Three Colors: Blue, White, Red'

Krzysztof Kieślowski avoids explicit political and religious tautology to make a case for faith that is wholly human -- and humane.

Reviews

A Beautiful Combination of Intellectual Subject Matter and a Genuinely Enjoyable Story

Olivier Assayas' Summer Hours starring the always-dazzling Juliette Binoche is rich and lush. Reminiscent, indeed, of the poignant passing of long sweet summer days.

Film

Outside the Lines - The Top 20 International/Indie Films of 2008

With many indie/international films receiving more and more mainstream approval from unfamiliar audiences, many of the titles here could be considered part of the overall 2008 Best Of. But their individuality and multicultural appeal keep them a quality concept apart.

Film

The Flight of the Red Balloon (Le Voyage du ballon rouge)

In Hou Hsiao-hsien's first French film, interactions are mirrored and refracted, images of images, reflections of longing.

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All Around the World: The Best International/Indie Films of 2007

Beginning and ending with the superlative filmmaking of Jia Zhang-ke, traversing the nooks and crannies of the globe, PopMatters presents the 20 best international and indie films of 2007.

Reviews

Dan in Real Life

Dan's behavior is increasingly creepy -- possessive, obsessive, and utterly self-centered.

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Part 4: Challenging Convention

As cinema went completely commercial, abandoning art for artifice, true aesthetic acumen was hard to come by. Luckily, for the movies included herein, it was their difference, as well as their diversity, that helped them stand out from the rest of the high concept hackwork.

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Hail Mary (1985)

A totally confounding and disappointing film, coupled with another that finds depth in its relative economy.

Jake Meaney
Reviews

Breaking and Entering (2006)

While Breaking and Entering leans heavily on its metaphors (see especially, the titular allusions), it doesn't make any of its roiling notions compelling.

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Caché (Hidden) (2005)

Michael Haneke's movies are never easy. Instead, they set out complex, multi-layered problems, encountered by ordinary-seeming characters, sometimes worked out but more usually left unresolved.

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Bee Season (2005)

Suffused with loss and longing, Bee Season is often graceful and moving.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Caché (2005)

Caché is Michael Haneke's latest unsettling look at the shaky foundations of bourgeois security.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Bee Season (2005)

Words are mystical, magical, and wholly material in Bee Season.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

In My Country (2005)

In the midst of this outrage, the film negotiates the intricacies of ubuntu by offering instances where a desire for revenge seems impossible to resist.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Three Colors Trilogy: Blue, White, Red (Trois Couleurs: Bleu, Blanc, Rouge)

Taken together, Blue, White, and Red are a visionary swan song for one of European cinema's most poetic moralists.

Michael S. Smith
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