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Off the Radar - The Top 30 DVDs of 2008

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Back to Basics - The 30 Best TV Shows of 2008

The Year in TV was a lot like the US economy: struggling until summer and then tanking under the hope of a 2009 comeback. Still, our staff found 30 solid reasons to be cheerful come entertainment investment time.

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South Park: The Cult of Cartman - Revelations

Cartman shows us gaping holes in our cultural and individual patterns: elitism, fundamentalism, and overt and habitual ignorance.

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High Redefinition: The 30 Best TV Shows of 2007

In memoriam of a TV season cut down before its prime time, PopMatters staff celebrates the Top 30 TV Shows of 2007. Some are old favorites. Others have barely made their impression felt. But at a time when all broadcast fortunes are up in the air, they definitely deserve the recognition.

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Christmas Time In South Park

This little collection, a compilation of seven Christmas episodes from the years 1997-2004, is a pretty great one-disc example of both the deeply disgusting depths and the insightful heights South Park manages to reach.

Stuart Henderson
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South Park: The Complete Tenth Season

This is the season when the series became self-aware, when addressing the constant media scrutiny lead to episodes that pushed the boundaries of satire and taste.

Reviews

South Park: The Complete Eighth Season

South Park's eighth season is dubbed "the year from hell" by co-creator Trey Parker.

Jesse Hicks
Reviews

South Park

As the boys grew pimply and fat (Cartman got fatter), the gaming company focused on finding more consumers. Everyone was at fault, from kids to corporate suits.

Sean Ferrell
Reviews

South Park: The Complete Seventh Season

Parker and Stone frequently use South Park as a platform for their libertarian views, and usually, it doesn't detract from the show's centrist, common-sense attitudes.

Tim O'Neil
Reviews

South Park: The Complete Sixth Season

Regardless of their childishness, the protagonists of South Park are, like their creators, fundamentally decent (except for Cartman, who represents the zenith of selfish indecency).

Tim O'Neil
Reviews

South Park

Parker and Stone are like observational stand-up comics, without all the wry self-referencing and glib performance shtick.

Bill Gibron
Reviews

Team America: World Police: Special Collector's Edition (2004)

Parker and Stone plainly love the size of this outrageous project, but they also understand and show off how silly that love is.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Team America: World Police (2004)

The much-ballyhooed parody of Jerry Bruckheimer-style action pictures is aptly violent, delirious, and outsized (in its miniature-puppet way).

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Bowling for Columbine (2002)

'John Ashcroft and his ilk are something to fear.'"

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Bowling for Columbine (2002)

Why are people scared? This question lies at the heart of Michael Moore's filmic essay on gun violence in the United States.

Cynthia Fuchs
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