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Books

'Kirby: King of Comics' Proves the Marvel Universe Lives and Dies on Paper

Comics films are fun but they barely scratch the surface of that other world, where comics really live and die.

Recent
Interviews

Midwestern 'Weirdness' Inspires Neil Gaiman's 'American Gods'

Neil Gaiman’s American Gods tackles earth-rumbling concepts -- faith, mortality, media obsession -- but his acclaimed novel is rooted in the relative quiet of the Midwest.

Neal Justin
Reviews

Neil Gaiman Takes on a Different Perspective

Readers of Gaiman's blog or Twitter feed know his schedule is always full of interesting projects. Here's proof that he's just as busy, and interesting, on the nonfiction side.

Music

Andrew Shapiro - "Bash Street Worlds" feat. Neil Gaiman (premiere)

Classically trained composer Andrew Shapiro possesses a deep love for melodic pop alongside his more high brow pursuits and he has a real sweet spot for synthpop.

Reviews

Violence, Glee, Phantasmagoria: Gaiman's 'Neverwhere'

Readers familiar with Neil Gaiman’s dreamscapes will find new corners of Neverwhere in this new edition of the author’s seminal first novel.

Reviews

The Art of the Author is Art Like No Other

What could have been little more than a longform book about Gaiman's Sandman becomes a visual and engrossing biography on the prolific dream genius.

Reviews

Doctor Who: The Complete Seventh Series

The clever boy is running... out of ideas.

Comics

Eliot, then Chopin: Investigating 'The Sandman: Preludes & Nocturnes'

Before Sandman, huh? Well that must mean there's at least a Sandman before, Before Sandman. So let's start at the beginning…

Brett Mobley
Comics

Drawn Back Into Dreaming: Spotlight on Neil Gaiman's 'Sandman'

Why would Neil Gaiman return to the proverbial scene of the crime, the scene of his greatest, grandest, longest-running comics success, the Sandman?

Brett Mobley
Books

Cogito, Ergo Sum (or Thereabouts): 'Neil Gaiman and Philosophy: Gods Gone Wild!'

For readers with only a cursory understanding of Western philosophy, this book might seem intimidating, but there's no need for worry. When the primary philosophers on call are Plato, Descartes, Nietzsche, and Sartre, it’s pretty clear we’re only coloring out of the Crayola box of eight.

Music

Amanda Palmer: Several Attempts to Cover Songs...

And the award for "Self-Explanatory Album Title of the Year" goes to... Amanda Palmer, for Several Attempts to Cover Songs by The Velvet Underground & Lou Reed for Neil Gaiman as His Birthday Approaches.

Reviews

Designed to Disturb: 'The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories'

To limit one's readings to H. P. Lovecraft is a bit like living in a creepy old Victorian house, but never bothering to investigate the shuffling in the attic, the banging in the basement, or the whispering voices. This book explores every nook of the house.

Books

Looking for Wit in Sci-Fi Lit?: 'Alien Contact' Has It

Marty Halpern’s editorial brief was for writers to concoct their narratives around first encounters with aliens and, duly noted, numerous authors are represented here with perfectly tailored schemes.

Gabrielle Malcolm
Books

'Opera Adaptations; Vols 1-3': A Synaesthetic Echo of the Operatic Performance

The graphic novel, in its robustness and variety, is the perfect setting for opera’s troubled universe.

Comics

Afflicting the Comfortable: An Interview with Terry Moore

The comic industry's great humanist talks about the end of Echo, his new series, Rachel Rising, and ponders ideas such as, "What if you mate the China syndrome with a collider?"

Comics

Absolute Death

Neil Gaiman's popular character from Sandman gets her own Absolute edition in a collection of good stories with some good extras, but a high price tag.

Comics

Absolute Sandman

Without it, there would be no Vertigo today, and perhaps none of the titles that have risen to prominence out of that publishing line.

Greg Oleksiuk
Reviews

Eternals #1

Jack Kirby had a knack for creating heady, mind-bending concepts dressed in superhero clothing, and Neil Gaiman simply refines this already brilliant material with sharp dialogue and characterization, while weaving it into a modern context.

Mike Lukich
Reviews

Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman

This is the first thing I've read of Neil's where the voice of the narrator sounded just like him. It's sharp and witty and clever and, well, British.

Stephen Rauch
Reviews

MirrorMask: The Illustrated Film Script of the Motion Picture from The Jim Henson Company by Neil Ga

And so we have the strange situation in which we can peruse at length the full script and storyboards well before we have any chance of seeing the movie itself. It's the ultimate spoiler.

Glenn McDonald
Reviews

Neil Gaiman's A Short Film About John Bolton (2003)

The affection Neil Gaiman shows for Marcus indicates that he doesn't hate critics, just what we represent: an ethos of inept misinterpretation aimed at elevating the academic over the visceral.

Dan Devine
Reviews
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