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Film

20 Films That Went From Bombs to Beloved

Not every cinematic bomb remains forgettable. Sometimes, a failure is just a gemstone in disguise that will only reveal itself well past the release date.

Recent
Books

'Reinventing Hollywood' Educates, Illuminates and Connects Films Past and Present

David Bordwell effectively argues that the change in the era of bold, different, sometimes difficult films from the '40s made a permanent mark of cinematic storytelling that resonates to this day.

Film

The Voice of the Demagogue and American So-Called Democracy

Gabriel Over the White House seriously asks a question that should only be asked as satire or farce: what if the best solution for the US is to have a fascist dictator in charge?

Film

Extra Large Popcorn, Please: The Film Forum's "Return of the Double Feature"

Originating as a practical means to ensure financial solvency, the “double feature” may now serve a more profound aesthetic purpose.

Reviews

The 'Magician' Is Orson Welles, But Not As You Know Him

The story of extravagant talent unfulfilled is turned on its head in this simplistic yet entertaining retelling of Orson Welles' career

Film

PopTalk: Breaking Down the Dollars and Cents of Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo offer both indie and major filmmakers an array of opportunities to see their visions realized. But does it come with strings attached?

Evan Sawdey and Brice Ezell
Film

Remembering Orson Welles at 100

Forgive Orson Welles his excesses from steaks and milkshakes to impossible dreams and wish him a happy birthday wherever he is.

Bob Hoover
Reviews

Orson Welles: The Lion in Winter, and at Lunch

Taken from long-lost recordings and filled with Hollywood gossip and personal revelations, this collection of transcripts proves why Orson Welles was one of the great conversationalists of all time.

Reviews

Hate for Orson Welles, Italian Style

Orson Welles In Italy is a key corrective resource for an under-examined portion of Welles' career. If America was resentful of his talent, Italy was downright mean.

Film

The Magnificently Mutilated Ambersons

Though Citizen Kane has cemented his place in film history, The Magnificent Ambersons -- especially had its original ending been kept -- would prove Orson Welles one of Hollywood’s greatest masters of tragedy, if not the greatest.

Film

Orson Welles' 'The Trial' Is a Study in Transcendental Sociology

It is to Orson Welles’ eternal credit that he is one of the few filmmakers — perhaps the only one — who actually got Kafka right.

Andrew Grossman
Film

Orson Welles and '40s Film Noir

As Welles had created shadowy noir images in the war years, by the end of the war, he captured the cultural climate of the emerging postwar era in his underrated 1946 noir, The Stranger.

Sheri Chinen Biesen
Film

Orson Welles' 'Citizen Kane' Is a Labyrinth Without a Centre

The labyrinth structure of Orson Welles' Citizen Kane calls for the audience to be shown a solution, the potential 'centre' of the film.

Carl Wilson
Film

Director Spotlight: Aspects of Orson Welles

From Citizen Kane (1941) to his "mutilated masterpiece" follow-up The Magnificent Ambersons to The Trial (1962), the essayists in this collection will take you on a journey into the filmic realms and mind of the filmmaker whom many call genius.

Film

The Pragmatic Anarchy of the Long Take

The Long Take can at once be subtle enough to be missed by the audience and astounding enough to entrance that same audience... depending on who is paying attention.

Film

Sight & Sound-Off: #3 - 'Tokyo Story' and 'Citizen Kane'

(B)oth Citizen Kane and Tokyo Story symbolize the essence of years misplaced. They argue that the wistful memories of the past only propagate disappointment in the present.

Television

No Contract for Old Men: 5 'Old Folks' in Pop Culture That Are 5Xs Tougher Than You

It'd be a shame if the endless emphasis on youth results in a lack of "grown-up" concerns in pop culture. Here are five examples of the old kicking ass and refusing to give way to the young in mainstream pop culture.

Film

Kafka Noir: 'The Sickroom' and 'A Country Doctor'

Serge Marcotte's The Sickroom compresses Franz Kafka's A Country Doctor into a nightmarish rush of hard-boiled film noir cynicism that, like all the best literary adaptations, is simultaneously faithful and unique.

Film

The 100 Essential Directors Part 10: Josef Von Sternberg to Zhang Yimou

The final day of directors is here, Josef Von Sternberg through Zhang Yimou. German Expressionism, Dogme 95, contemporary views of Asian life, post-WWII malaise in Eastern Europe, and the alternately heartwarming and queer takes on everyday life in Baltimore all hold a space on today's list. Did we forget your favorite director on this list?

Books

Orson Welles Lied About This Book

Either the name on the cover or his denial of authorship is false. This is typical for Welles.

Books

DVR Alert: Orson Welles Film Fest on Turner Classic Movies (6 May)

Welles was perhaps the best friend literature ever had in Hollywood.

Reviews

Night Court: The Complete Third Season

There were 193 episodes taped during Night Court's run from 1984 to 1992; the third season is when the show began to hit its stride and is arguably the best.

Film

Orson Welles: A Man of a Certain Ego

“The chief proof of a man’s real greatness lies in his perception of his own smallness. It argues... a power of comparison and of appreciation which is in itself proof of nobility.”

Reviews

Voyage of the Dammed

An affecting, if flawed, middlebrow drama about a seldom-discussed Depression-era tragedy.

Film

An Auteur's Touch of Evil

The auteur is dead, long live the auteur: Orson Welles and Touch of Evil, 50 years on.

Reviews

Malpertuis

The late great Orson Welles lends his “bear-like” presence to this 1972 thriller with just the “right bad taste".

Michael Barrett
Reviews

Tyrone Power: The Swashbuckler Box Set (1949)

Some favorite DVD box sets that will round out any classics collection.

Michael Barrett
Reviews

Essential Classics - Dramas (1947)

This collection is an archive which excludes the archivist as target audience.

Erik Hinton
Reviews

A Man for All Seasons: Special Edition (1966)

A Man for All Seasons is an overblown, stuffy history lesson without much to offer in the way of cinematic innovation. It's beautifully safe and painfully accurate.

Matt Mazur
Reviews

The Dick Cavett Show - Hollywood Greats

This is not only an entertaining, funny, and smart guide to the glory days of Hollywood; it is an essential and useful tool for film historians.

Matt Mazur
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Time Encapsulating: The Best DVDs of 2006

From solid single issues to amazingly complete film and television compilations, the works highlighted here argue for DVD's continued importance.

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