polyvinyl

Dream Pop’s Hazel English Urges Us to ‘Wake UP!’

Dream Pop’s Hazel English Urges Us to ‘Wake UP!’

On her Polyvinyl debut Wake Up! Hazel English works through thorny relationships with a collection of breezy, dreamy indie rock tunes with touches of a little bit of everything from country and contemporary pop to psychedelia and Motown.

Anna Burch Creates a Sophisticated Slice of Indie Dream-Pop with ‘If You’re Dreaming’

Anna Burch Creates a Sophisticated Slice of Indie Dream-Pop with ‘If You’re Dreaming’

Anna Burch's sophomore album, If You're Dreaming, is a jazzy, sophisticated, timeless joy from start to finish.

Yumi Zouma’s ‘Truth or Consequences’ Is Social Distancing Set to Music

Yumi Zouma’s ‘Truth or Consequences’ Is Social Distancing Set to Music

Yumi Zouma, a once-New Zealand-based band whose members scattered to four different cities around the world, return with a sparkling new pop album about distance, Truth or Consequences.

Debut Record of the Year? Squirrel Flower Is in the Running With ‘I Was Born Swimming’

Debut Record of the Year? Squirrel Flower Is in the Running With ‘I Was Born Swimming’

Tougher than you think, Squirrel Flower’s first album, I Was Born Swimming, combines Joni Mitchell with dream pop, but with an indie rock bite.

Jay Som: Turn Into

Jay Som: Turn Into

Melina Duterte of Jay Som has had quite the whirlwind year, and to cap it off, she is re-releasing her 2015 album Untitled as Turn Into on Polyvinyl.
La Sera: Music for Listening to Music To

La Sera: Music for Listening to Music To

Music for Listening to Music To is commendable in its display of sadness within a boxed-in life, speeding through the road before hearing its praise.
White Reaper: White Reaper Does It Again

White Reaper: White Reaper Does It Again

There’s a predictability to the new White Reaper LP, but the band’s core competency will likely keep most listeners from caring too much.
Of Montreal: Aureate Gloom (take 1)

Of Montreal: Aureate Gloom (take 1)

Aureate Gloom is a soliloquy to anyone willing to listen, an intense affirmation of the confusion that comes with change, and of the uncertainty that comes with difficult choices.
Owls: Two

Owls: Two

Two is certainly a good album, and it’s absolutely the one Owls wanted to make. It’s just not always a record I want to listen to.

Joan of Arc: Life Like

Soundscape Mix #9: Disco, The Continuing Last Days

Braid: Frankie Welfare Boy Age Five / The Age of Octeen