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Still Living Dangerously After All These Years

As autocratic leaders slowly take over the First World, popular representations of a Third World coup take on renewed significance.

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Reviews

Discover a Hero in 'Cedar Rapids'

What's at first blush a light-hearted comedy is actually a much more profound tale.

Film

The Ice Storm: America Out in the Cold

Ang Lee captures the '70s on film the way Rick Moody captures the era in the book The Ice Storm. It's the midst of the sexual revolution, the Watergate scandal is erupting, and the country's social consciousness is changing.

Film

The New Classics - The 30 Best Films of 2008

Unlike previous years, where classics came crawling out of the celluloid woodwork with regular reckless abandon, 2008 was more calm… and considered. That's not to say that choosing 30 top titles was hard. The difficulty in placing them in some manner of rank order suggests the actual depth of quality involved.

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Off the Radar - The Top 30 DVDs of 2008

Oddly enough, while the major studios continue scratching their heads over how to sell yet another new format (Blu-ray) to disinterested consumers, several outside distributors made sure that this would be a digital year to remember.

Reviews

Wall-E

The first half hour of Wall-E is a lyrical, magical achievement in filmmaking, which if it ended there, would make the movie an undisputed classic.

Reviews

Vantage Point

It’s almost rather brilliant the way the film betrays and sabotages itself as it comes down the home stretch.

Film

Robot Holocaust

In the second half of our Disney discussion, the way in which the dystopian world of WALL*E was sold to a susceptible public is dissected.

Film

Consumer Apocalypse: WALL-E

As part of a double dose of Disney Monday, Chris Barsanti looks at the recent release from CG savants Pixar.

Reviews

WALL∙E

For much of WALL∙E, the titular robot speaks not a word, but instead whimpers or exclaims, his language an assortment of expressive erps and eeps.

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The Return of the Popcorn Circus: June 2008

If May almost tent-poled itself out of existence, June will be even worse. After all, are audiences really ready for 13 major release in less than two months -- with more to come?

Reviews

Baby Mama

If he's not precisely magical in Baby Mama, Oscar (Romany Malco) does function as wise advisor for white women who should know better.

Reviews

The Ice Storm

The general fuzzed-out sense of malaise that Lee is able to tap into while exploring the Nixon-era sexual revolution (and repression and adventure), creates a point of view that both ruthlessly observes and empathizes with these alien suburbanites.

Reviews

Vantage Point

As Vantage Point becomes increasingly busy with personal betrayals and redemptions, the ostensible politics, reductive to begin with, fall by the wayside.

Reviews

The TV Set

The TV Set on DVD, with its various articulations of anger and frustration, makes for entertaining therapy; now it's time for Kasdan to let go and love again.

Jesse Hassenger
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Part 4: Challenging Convention

As cinema went completely commercial, abandoning art for artifice, true aesthetic acumen was hard to come by. Luckily, for the movies included herein, it was their difference, as well as their diversity, that helped them stand out from the rest of the high concept hackwork.

Reviews

Snow Cake (2006)

Alex first appears in Snow Cake aboard a plane, embodying an obvious contradiction, in motion and still at the same time.

Film

Infamous (2006)

When Truman quite gleefully describes his plan to use 'fictional techniques' to tell his nonfiction story, to shape the Clutter murders as an emblem of cultural malaise, Nelle insists on a knowable distinction between fact and fiction.

Film

Imaginary Heroes (2004)

Dan Harris's Imaginary Heroes keeps digging into Sandy's darkly-secreted past, producing revelations less surprising than wearisome.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

The Village (2004)

'I have to keep doing things that scare me, and this certainly scares me,' says M. Night Shyamalan.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

The Village (2004)

Noah is so wrapped up in his own emotions that he seems, at first, the most literal embodiment of the film's critique of a post-9/11 American isolationism.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Tadpole (2002)

In assuming Oscar's perspective, the film makes out like everyone is as smitten with him as he is.

Cynthia Fuchs

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