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Get the Fuzzy Navels Ready, It's LGBT Movie Time

Queer, Isn't It? presents the first of five films in its LGBT Hall of Fame.

Reviews

Igor

Lesley Smith
Recent
Reviews

The Big Lebowski: 10th Anniversary Edition

A generation-defining comedy about peace and brotherhood, set in a world of backstabbers, liars, and semi-professional bowling leagues.

Film

Talk, Talk, Talk: December 2008

Just like the end of an inspiring speech that may or may not succeed in making its point, these final four weeks before 2009 tend to define or defeat the entire awards season purpose.

Film

Talk, Talk, Talk: September 2008

From wars both past and present to a number of nail-biting thrillers, September is sizing up as a potentially profitable one.

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Super Duper Bad: The Worst Films of 2007

From Good Luck Chuck to Julie Taymor's ill-advised Beatlesque '60s tribute Across the Universe, PopMatters presents the dreck of 2007.

Reviews

Interview

Pierre and Katya are too strange and too duplicitous for their conversation to have any deeper level than simply skewering the vapidity of most celebrity journalism.

Jack Patrick Rodgers
Reviews

I Think I Love My Wife

When you strip away all its jokiness and "Rock-isms", there's actually a good film hiding in here.

Tiffany White
Reviews

Interview

Katya and Pierre's mutual distrust is predictable, but the movie emphasizes their sometimes surprising sameness.

Reviews

I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2007)

Ving Rhames gets that Duncan can be gay, and not have to be a fulltime "flamer," in the film's parlance.

Reviews

I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2007)

This gay marriage movie isn’t really ready to deal with the overriding disputes that arise whenever civil rights and civil unions become part of the human dialogue.

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Part 5: The Return of the Auteur

That noise you heard near the start of the new millennium was the creative din of a brash new breed of filmmakers tearing down the traditions of mainstream moviemaking. Their motion picture mission statements -- including the ones featured on this list -- remain the rulebook for new generations of anxious film artists.

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Kids' DVDs: June 2007

Given that babies and young children love nothing more than repetition, repetition, and... um.... repetition, I can't understand why even the pointiest of heads would think children between the ages of six months and three years could possible need 23 different Baby Einstein DVDs.

Film

Monkey Business (Part 3: July)

Finally, a month with only one remaining series contender. All wizard based Potter-y aside, this will be the most tenuous time for the business called show. After a strong start, the eccentric collection of entertainments here could make or break this potentially record shattering motion picture season.

Reviews

I Think I Love My Wife (2007)

The movie is an erratic, noisy, and anxious paean to masculine desire. In a word, it's all about dick.

Reviews

Charlottes Web (2006)

Surprise! There is nothing even remotely offensive or ironic or postmodern about Charlotte's Web.

Daynah Burnett
Film

Lonesome Jim (2006)

Anika (Liv Tyler) is either an earthbound guardian angel or the Midwest's most voluptuously lipped stalker.

Marisa Carroll
Reviews

Twenty Bucks (1993)

Reflecting its long gestation period, Twenty Bucks seems ageless, its photography and art direction creating an ambiguous timestamp.

Glenn Michael McDonald
Film

The Island (2005)

Ewan McGregor and Scarlett Johansson run around in an efficiently digitized near-future scary-scape, occasionally propelled by ethical questions about cloning.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Coffee and Cigarettes (2004)

Coffee and Cigarettes is a return, of sorts, for Jim Jarmusch.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

13 Moons (2002)

In this world of unbelievable coincidences, Karma battles fate for the destiny of all involved.

Bill Gibron
Film

Coffee and Cigarettes (2004)

Coffee and Cigarettes is a return, of sorts, for Jim Jarmusch.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Coffee and Cigarettes (2004)

On its own terms, Coffee and Cigarettes is an effective addiction movie, self-indulgent but also familiar and low-key.

Jesse Hassenger
Reviews

Big Fish (2003)

Edward's persistent self-inflation frustrates Will, just as its contradictions appeal to Burton.

Cynthia Fuchs
Television

The Sopranos

As The Sopranos enters its fifth season, it's clear that things will not go well for New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano.

Oliver Wang
Film

Big Fish (2003)

Edward is less obviously an outsider than Burton's other Edwards (Scissorhands and Wood), but equally filled with a winning sense of wonder.

Jesse Hassenger
Reviews

Fargo (1996)

This is the film's genius, its simultaneous emulation and excavation of true crime's obsession with dull or spectacular minutiae, coupled with a refusal to make such details cohere into master plans and meanings.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Living in Oblivion (1995)

Living in Oblivion's fine cast works together like a dream.

Jocelyn Szczepaniak-Gillece
Film

The Grey Zone (2002)

This crepuscular work offers the most realistic depiction of the infernal workings of a Nazi death camp ever seen in a fiction film.

Elbert Ventura
Film

Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams (2002)

Juni and Carmen's perspective, part convincingly ingenuous and part movie-kid calculated, organizes the film's general view of things.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Monsters, Inc. (2001)

PULL.

Tracy McLoone

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