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More Than Fangirls: Reading 'The Spectacular Sisterhood of Superwomen' in Trump's America

There are a lot of strong female characters here. There are just as many, however, who are fit only to remind us of how far we have to go.

Recent
Comics

Riverdale and Our Discontents: Bart Beaty's 'Twelve-Cent Archie'

The secret of Archie is that neither its characters nor its readers desire any kind of truth at all. What we love most about comics is the balance of the art with story.

Kenneth E. Harrison, Jr.
Comics

It's Alive! The Changing Face of Dick Briefer's Frankenstein

Dick Briefer's Frankenstein was a patchwork monster, both horrible and hilarious. Few comic book creations can claim as much life as this creature possessed.

Comics

The Necessary Audacity of 'Bitch Planet'

Kelly Sue DeConnick doesn't go easy on the patriarchy.

Comics

Batman and Other Creatures of the Night

As Halloween approaches, it's time once again to think about the creatures of the night – about ghosts, vampires, werewolves and demons. It's time to think about Batman.

Comics

Re-Imagining Pellucidar: Jamie Chase's and Bobby Nash's 'At the Earth's Core'

Dark Horse, in conjunction with Sequential Pulp Comics, has just issued a marvelous graphic novel adaptation of At the Earth's Core. Pellucidar, and David Innes, are suddenly alive in ways that they have never been before.

Comics

X-Men ex nihilo? The Secret Origins of Marvel's Mutant Superheroes

When Kirby and Lee introduced the X-Men to the world, they did so without recourse to that staple of the superhero genre, the origin story. That doesn't mean that the mutant superheroes arose ex nihilo, however. They clearly have roots in these four classic sci-fi novels.

Comics

Big Art and Big Ideas in Jack Kirby's 'Devil Dinosaur'

Today comics giant Jack Kirby would have celebrated his 98th birthday. It's time to commemorate his mightiest monster.

Television

Talking 'Steampunk'd' With Jeannie Mai

Jeannie Mai hosts GSN's Steampunk'd, a ten-episode long experience into the world and culture of steampunk.

Comics

The Birth of DC/Vertigo Comics Was a Messy One

In the '90s, Vertigo was a brand new day for comics, completely unprecedented. It celebrated grunge and alternative music. And then it became embraced by the mainstream.

John Tamarri
Comics

'Death Sentence London' and the Success of Doomed Generations

Death Sentence: London #3 makes me consider what it would be like if we lived under a President Trump.

Comics

Grunge Rock, Flannel, the Birth of DC/Vertigo, Whatever

Vertigo was a completely unprecedented break in the corporate backing of artistic creativity. But it needed the '90s to come into being.

John Tamarri
Comics

Songs About the Southland: Marvel's Black Panther vs. the Klan

It was a hot Southern summer when the Black Panther came down South to do battle with the Klan.

Comics

'Lantern City' and its Steampunk Futures

There's a depth to Lantern City that great artists like Victor Hugo and J.D. Salinger and the Marx Brothers have been struggling with since the very beginning.

Comics

Image Comics Challenges the Comics Industry with 'Island #1'

Island #1 brings something to comics that hasn’t been as popular for a long time now, the anthology comicbook.

John Tamarri
Comics

'Lantern City' and Its Steampunk Origins

Origins aren't predicative of outcomes. But the consequences of choices are compounded over time. This becomes remarkably apparent with Lantern City's choice of genre in steampunk.

Comics

'Crisis on Infinite Earths' 30 Years On

In 1985, Crisis on Infinite Earths was a necessary evil to tie together inchoate timelines in DC's grander continuity. No one could foresee this book coming to define the next 30 years in comics.

Gregory L. Reece
Comics

Plumbing the Depths of Space and Human Psychology in 'Southern Cross'

On its surface Southern Cross is a simple tale—a beloved sister dies, a loving sister hops an interplanetary transport to reclaim the body and investigate the death. But there hidden depths here, both literary and human.

Comics

Heavy Metal or Why the All-New Batman Totally Rocks

Bruce Wayne who? The most entertaining Batman story in sometime finds Commissioner Gordon donning the cowl.

Comics

What's at Stake with Warren Ellis's 'Injection'

Warren Ellis tackles the same theme from Marlowe's Faustus, and carries the grander ambitions of comics with him.

Comics

John McCrea's Fun-Loving, Magical Terrors in 'Mythic'

John McCrea’s combination of bananas-crazy and legit-scary artwork is enough to keep one enthusiastically following the title all on its own, patiently waiting for the meat of the plot and/or characters to reveal themselves in full.

Comics

Four Great Things About 'Nonplayer'

It's been four years since the release of the first issue of Nonplayer, but it's been well worth the wait.

Comics

It's Time to Hear the Truth After Growing Up Spidey

"Spider-Man No More", like other superhero stories of loss, are so universally true, so much about loss, responsibility, and guilt.

Gregory L. Reece
Comics

The Many Faces of Love in 'The Names'

Our three-part series looking at Peter Milligan and Leandro Fernandez's The Names draws to a close with a love note of sorts.

Comics

The Heightened Reality of the Art in 'The Names'

Today, our series looking at Peter Milligan and Leandro Fernandez's The Names continues, with a focus on the art of the comic.

Comics

Loyalty and Tribalism in 'The Names'

The nastiest, scariest, most threatening villains in The Names are a group of betrayers within the Names known as the League of Psychopaths, and this is only the beginning.

Matthew Derman
Comics

Three Fully Formed Concepts in First Issues: 'The Maximortal', 'Deep Sleeper' and 'Rebel Blood'

The first time I read The Maximortal #1, I honestly believed it was a self-contained one-shot. Was I ever wrong.

Matthew Derman
Comics

Why They Fight: A Brief History of Batman Battling Superman

Over the course of any relationship, especially ones that last three quarters of a century, there's bound to be some friction, some tension and some overall sour times.

Comics

Cars That Will Kill You, An 'Avengers: Age of Ultron' Triptych Finalé

Thus far, we've seen director Joss Whedon leverage the history of comics fandom and of Hollywood film in a grand and postmodern experiment. Here's why.

Comics

Avengers Age of Ultron, a Triptych's Second Frame

Avengers: Age of Ultron is an amazing spectacle and there's very little you don't see. But if there is something unnoticed, it might be how seamlessly Whedon crafts the movie into the history of Hollywood.

Comics

A Response to Avengers: Age of Ultron, in Triptych

Even after Daredevil, especially after Daredevil, Avengers: Age of Ultron might be the finest realization of the Marvel Universe on screen.

Comics

'The Cartoon Introduction to Philosophy' Is Something of a Duck-Rabbit Itself

The Cartoon Introduction to Philosophy does more than introduce major themes and arguments in philosophy. It raises interesting questions about the visual nature of philosophy itself.

Gregory Reece
Television

Every Generation Gets the 'Daredevil' It Deserves

Marvel's Daredevil is a reminder that our pop culture, even that which is rooted in the pulp tradition, can be vivid, vital, and powerful.

Comics

The Steady Increase of Awfulness in 'Borb'

With homages to Little Orphan Annie and Gasoline Alley, there's a lot serious ground to cover in Borb, and a lot of serious laughs.

Matthew Derman
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