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Books

Make Time Read John Berger and Selçuk Demirel's 'What Time Is It?'

Although the topics in John Berger and Selçuk Demirel's excellent What Time Is It may instinctively feel morbid and fraught, the overall effect is quite satisfying, even tranquilizing.

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Music

Max Richter: The Blue Notebooks

If The Blue Notebooks was ever in danger of not being considered a classic, let this re-visitation be a way to cover our bases.

Reviews

Hungarian Master Béla Tarr's Austere, Atmospheric Masterpiece: 'The Man from London'

A visually stunning exploration of fatalism, morality, and temptation, The Man from London is as good a place as any to begin exploring the work of one of cinema's most unique and masterful auteurs

Film

One by One, We're All Becoming Shades: An Interview with Anjelica Huston

In her newest film 50/50, the actress brings everything full circle, combining comedy and high drama with another far less-discussed area of her expertise: the ability to work a good old-fashioned bad wig and turn it into a powerful acting tool.

Reviews

Melancholy and Happiness Are Rarely Separate in 'Orlando'

Edgy and chaotic, much like Virginia Woolf’s ground-breaking modernist oeuvre, Orlando blurs the boundaries of time, emotion, and self.

Film

Everything in its Right Place: The Best Female Acting Performances of 2009

Mazur checks out the year's best female acting and offers up a mostly alternative opinion to the boring Oscar-begging consensus picks including some you might not have heard about, yet.

Music

Patrick Wolf: The Bachelor

He's had quite a run thus far but at the tender age of 25, eccentric chamber-pop wunderkind Patrick Wolf finally has his first bona fide misstep on his hands.

Reviews

Julia

Julia is a mix of fantasy and tragedy, with the violence amped up and the background noisy and lurid.

Film

The Limits of Control

The limits of control are simultaneously intimate and global. And Isaac De Bankolé's face reveals just as much as you can know.

Film

Summer of Same: May 2009

May's titles include the fourth films in two aging franchises, more Pixar perfection, and the reboot of a TV series from 40 years ago. And they say there are no new ideas.

Film

The New Classics - The 30 Best Films of 2008

Unlike previous years, where classics came crawling out of the celluloid woodwork with regular reckless abandon, 2008 was more calm… and considered. That's not to say that choosing 30 top titles was hard. The difficulty in placing them in some manner of rank order suggests the actual depth of quality involved.

Film

Iconic - The Top 20 Male Performances of 2008

Like the gladiators of old, 2008 resembles a battle of formidable acting gods, especially when looking over the 20 choices presented below. Indeed, if anything, choosing a winner requires more of a leap of faith than any amount of critical skill - they all were that good.

Reviews

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

It's an inelegant but provocative means to measure Benjamin and Daisy's ostensibly transcendent connection: as he grows young and she grows old, they share but a single moment when their bodies and visions and hopes can easily coincide.

Reviews

Burn After Reading

Ozzie (John Malkovich) embodies the problem of the CIA, of the "intelligence community," which is that it reacts to data, then fashions a story about it to comport with the reaction.

Film

Talk, Talk, Talk: December 2008

Just like the end of an inspiring speech that may or may not succeed in making its point, these final four weeks before 2009 tend to define or defeat the entire awards season purpose.

Film

Talk, Talk, Talk: September 2008

From wars both past and present to a number of nail-biting thrillers, September is sizing up as a potentially profitable one.

Film

Life Into Art: Strange Culture and the Measure of Documentary Film

Strange Culture is a critical entry point into the current discussion of what makes a documentary a documentary, most notably because it announces its own subjectivity in a clear and provocative way.

Shaun Huston
Television

Independent Lens: Deep Water

Deep Water tracks Donald Crowhurst's voyage over the horizon and into himself, filtered through observations by associates and family members, and amplified by his own logs.

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A Gallery of Good Works: The Best Films of 2007

From Julian Schnabel's artsy The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to the legendary Coen Brothers splendid adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men, PopMatters counts down the 30 best films of 2007.

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All Around the World: The Best International/Indie Films of 2007

Beginning and ending with the superlative filmmaking of Jia Zhang-ke, traversing the nooks and crannies of the globe, PopMatters presents the 20 best international and indie films of 2007.

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Performance Art: The Best Acting of 2007 - Female

From the most sweetly nuanced performance of Jennifer Jason Leigh's career to Cate Blanchett's revelatory portrayal of Bob Dylan in I'm Not There, the women of 2007 were stellar.

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Performance Art: The Best Acting of 2007 - Male

From the tender and eerie precision of Sam Riley's depiction of Joy Division singer Ian Curtis in Control to yet another superlative performance by Daniel Day-Lewis in There Will Be Blood, PopMatters highlights the best male actors of 2007.

Reviews

Strange Culture

Strange Culture presents Kurtz's bizarre legal and political predicament within layers of context, having to do with fears of terrorism and art, the Patriot Act and U.S. prosecutorial zealousness.

Film

Michael Clayton

The film's strength lies in its poetic inclinations, its meditation on the ways that money, politics, and fear shape moral choices.

Film

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (2005)

The scariest scene in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe comes at the start.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Broken Flowers (2005)

A sort of minimalist male melodrama, Broken Flowers tracks a journey through regret and hope.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Constantine (2005)

Doubting his mission and his faith even as he's consumed by them, Constantine is an achingly topical comic book/movie hero.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Young Adam (2003)

'Joe's abandonment is like a political act and a political philosophy, he's a libertine and a libertarian,' says Tilda Swinton.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Young Adam (2003)

Joe's trajectory through post-war Glasgow and Edinburgh takes on a sort of dread inevitability.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Teknolust (2002)

Tilda Swinton is perfectly suited to Leeson's cyberfeminist project.

Daniel Mudie Cunningham
Film

The Statement (2003)

The Statement is a rarity: a serious, politically-minded thriller.

Michael Healey
Reviews

Adaptation

Careens between fiction and confession, repetition and revelation.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Adaptation

Careens between fiction and confession, repetition and revelation.

Cynthia Fuchs

Reviews
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