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Film

A 'Saturday Night Live' Take on Jack Webb's 'Dragnet' Franchise

Shout! Factory brings back the Saturday Night Live parody of the original Dragnet.

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Reviews

Angels & Demons

A slight upgrade from its predecessor is not enough to recommend such a forgettable production.

Reviews

Angels & Demons

A Harvard professor is an unlikely candidate for the hero of a summer blockbuster, and Angels & Demons demonstrates exactly why. The film is filled with talk, talk, talk.

Film

Summer of Same: May 2009

May's titles include the fourth films in two aging franchises, more Pixar perfection, and the reboot of a TV series from 40 years ago. And they say there are no new ideas.

Film

Part 5: Toy Story 2 to Titus (November - December 1999)

On this final day of PopMatters' 1999 overview, awards season hype gives way to pure acting prowess and definitive directorial flair.

Reviews

Charlie Wilson's War

Sorkin's signature dialogue -- smart, rapid fire chatter that packs a punch -- makes this the most engaging poli-sci class you'll ever attend.

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Performance Art: The Best Acting of 2007 - Male

From the tender and eerie precision of Sam Riley's depiction of Joy Division singer Ian Curtis in Control to yet another superlative performance by Daniel Day-Lewis in There Will Be Blood, PopMatters highlights the best male actors of 2007.

Reviews

Charlie Wilson's War

Like The West Wing, Charlie Wilson's War is leftish and glib, entertaining and exasperating, and written by Aaron Sorkin.

Television

Ken Burns' Arithmetic of War: 'The War' Premieres Tonight

To its credit, The War considers the terrible effects of difference. But even as it argues that representations can make differences, it also exemplifies how limited vision can reinforce them.

Reviews

That Thing You Do! - The Directors Cut (1996)

That Thing You Do!, the movie, is humorous and entertaining. Skip the annoying extras, and you'll actually enjoy it.

Marc Calderaro
Reviews

Big

Over the course of eight months, four body switch movies were released in the late '80s. Only one Big remains standing.

Reviews

Who Killed the Electric Car? (2006)

In Chris Paine’s witty and very partisan documentary, we are presented with the sad but familiar tale of corporate greed and corruption shaping our daily lives -- shaping it without our support, but with our apathy.

Brian Holcomb
Reviews

The Da Vinci Code (2006)

If religion, to paraphrase Oscar Wilde, is the fashionable substitute for belief, then The Da Vinci Code, judging by author Dan Brown’s quasi religious following, has asserted itself as the fashionable substitute for religion

Marc Acherman
Reviews

The Da Vinci Code

In straining to make its spaces and secrets 'scary', Da Vinci literalizes thoughts and dreams, and abandons mystery and nuance.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Toy Story: 10th Anniversary Edition (1995)

Ten years on, much of Pixar's Toy Story, the first computer-animated feature film, is as sweet and smart as ever.

Jesse Hassenger
Reviews

The Terminal (2004)

The saga of Viktor Navorski (Tom Hanks) is an apt reflection of what might be termed a global fear.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

The Polar Express (2004)

It's part Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory, and part Terry Gilliam's Brazil, that is, just this side of sinister.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

The Ladykillers (2004)

Pious, earnest, and broadly drawn, Marva is the first black character in a Coen brothers movie to occupy center stage.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

The Terminal (2004)

Viktor is pronounced 'unacceptable', a man without nation, identity, or status.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

A League of Their Own (1992)

A League of Their Own is an engagingly old fashioned and family-friendly comedy.

Jesse Hassenger
Film

The Ladykillers (2004)

Pious, earnest, and broadly drawn, Marva is the first black character in a Coen brothers movie to occupy center stage. For a minute, anyway.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Catch Me If You Can (2002)

Steven Spielberg's zippy new film is about the kind of 'truth' that might only be apprehended in its telling.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

Punchline (1988)

Explores a dark side of stand-up comedy, but relies on stereotypes rather than shedding new light on the subject.

Valerie Franch
Reviews

Road to Perdition (2002)

The perfectly grim surface evokes eons of pain, as well as a highly stylized contemporary sensibility, not so much cynical as skeptical and self-aware.

Cynthia Fuchs

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